Our Favorite Rooms at the 2017 Spring Break Art Show

Spring/Break is one of the Armory Week attractions I try not to miss, it unapologetically has fun with art – blocking out the cynical in favor of its dialogue driven exhibits.  This year it moved out of the Moynihan Station Post Office and into swankier digs in Times Square.  What didn’t change – is the integrity of the show, the feeling of being sent off to the races into the all encompassing line of rooms. The rooms can be a showdown of hit-or-miss aesthetics, but it affords the artist space to create a story, and that discovery is always worth the price of admission.

This year, the annual curator-driven art show, Spring/Break chose Black Mirror as its theme.   Here’s a list of the rooms we loved walking thru.

 

Hometown Hero (Chink) /Thinly Worn | Valery Jung Estabrook

I shudder to think that I almost walked past this room without meeting Valery Jung Estabrook 

Hometown Hero (Chink) featured an installation of three parts: a single channel video, a custom upholstered recliner, and a fabric-covered room furnished with other upholstered items that immediately transport you to a version of the American South. The items reveal hidden personal histories that cling to Jung’s experiences growing up a mixed-race Korean American who was taught to revere a past to which she felt no connection.

The recliner – with its looming imagery of the Confederate flag, dominates the space. It sits facing the television, acting as a physical stand-in for the [cheap] desire to return to an idealized fictional version of America – the wish to “Make America Great Again.”  Everything in that room is in direct opposition of Jung Estabrook’s honest conversations regarding race, alienation, and assimilation playing on the television with a repeating video clip featuring segments called Twinkie, Wasp and assimilation that features Jung Estabrook lip syncing while dressed as Tammi Wynette.

 

“Thinking about everything, but then again, I was thinking about nothing” | Tamara Santibanez

Tamara Santibanez recreates her adolescent bedroom in shades of white symbolizing the purity of memories we wish to retain. Her pen drawings of rock band posters and t-shirts hang among the other trappings of a certain youth – cassettes, AM/FM radio, vinyl’s, studded leather wrist bands and jeans tossed casually on the carpet make for a trip I didn’t want to end.

Sophiya Khwaja | Cade Tompkins Projects

Sophiya Khawaja‘s hoops sans the cloth and thread that traditionally sit between the two wooden circles, showcase images of herself, a solitary female figure trapped – possessing – raging and navigating the landscapes she inhabits. Each become a symbol of the female encased in the intricate bindings of the world around her.

“Melissa Godoy-Nieto: Dream Journal,” curated by Ambre and Andrew Gori

Visitors were invited to share their dreams with Godoy-Nieto so she could translate them into drawings.  If you took part in the project, I hear you might be able to find your dreams roaming wild & free on Melissa’s website.

Sisyphus | Light Sculpture | Valerie Sullivan Fuchs

Sisyphus, 2009, is a palm sized video projection where the viewers capture the video onto their open hands. The video is of a woman who appears to climb up the viewer’s hand but slides back down repeatedly. Each time she slides back down, she draws a line of chalk which appears to mix with the lines of the view’s palm.

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Further Explanations into Contemporary Blackness : New Work From Azikiwe Mohammed 
Azikwe Mohammad travels from last year’s Jimmy Thrift Store, a project based around New Davonhaime, a fictional town whose name is a make up of the five cities with the highest African-American populations (Detroit, Savannah,  Jackson, Birmingham, and New Orleans).  Mohammad filled the room with thrift shops finds (elaborate chintzy lamps, old albums, neon signs and ceramic figurines) cast offs ready to breathe new life into old lives.  Assuming the personality of Jimmy, Mohammad told us colorful stories of the non-existent town until it felt relevant, until we felt like we’d benefit from visiting.
This year Mohammad was back in a less structured space with more stories to tell, a memorial to those we lost this past year in violence, a closer look into the lives of those from Davonhaime. Names and faces were memorialized on airbrushed t-shirts and iconic jewelry found in nearly every African-American home. Photographs from his visit to the cities were rolled up and placed in containers for those who felt like delving a bit deeper.
It was as if last years’ search for stories was a mere beginning into the insight into the crux of the stories he evokes through memory and representation. I remember when Mohammed had a seat out in the hallway of the first Spring Break Fair, patiently explaining his hip-hop tapestries to us.  Each year his exploration into African American iconography gets deeper and more creatively explorative.

Your Art Fair Guide for Armory Week 2017

It’s Armory Week and that means gaggles of art fairs will be taking place across New York City.  It’s going to be a whirlwind of amazing art from all over the world, informative talks and lots of Art Star Selfies.  We don’t suggest you try to tackle every fair, choose the ones that interest you the most and pace yourself. Fair fatigue is real–trying to see more art than your brain can process at one time will just ruin the whole experience. Trust us on this… Oh, and by all means, wear comfortable shoes.

1. Armory Show

The Armory Show is the daddy of all the fairs.  It’s the big Kahuna with over 200 galleries showing on Piers 92 & 94 for four days of incredible art, engaging talks and daring projects. Walking through both piers can be exhausting, take breaks, and check your coat.  The coat line is so long – one would think they were giving out free drinks – but it’s worth the hands-free next few hours.

Your Art Fair Guide for Armory Week 2017

Photograph by Teddy Wolff | Courtesy of The Armory Show

March 2–5, 2017
Thursday, March 2, 12–8pm
Friday, March 3, 12–8pm
Saturday, March 4, 12–7pm
Sunday, March 5, 12–6pm
Pier 94 and Pier 92, 711 12th Avenue between West 55th Street and West 52nd Street
$47 general admission, or $60 with VOLTA admission

 

2. Volta NY

Volta is Armory’s sister fair – one that keeps getting better in terms of curation.  Its’ art boutique feel is a refreshing change from the chaos that will be happening at Pier 92 & 94 with the Armory crowd. By spotlighting artists through primarily solo projects, VOLTA NY refocuses the art fair experience back to its most fundamental point: the artists and their works.

The Volta fair takes place at Pier 90. Photo: David Williams, courtesy Volta.

The Volta fair takes place at Pier 90.
Photo: David Williams, courtesy Volta.

 

MARCH 2–5, 2017

THURSDAY – SATURDAY, MARCH 2 – 4, 12 – 8 pm | SUNDAY, MARCH 5, 12 – 5 pm

Pier 90, 711 12th Avenue at West 48th Street
$22.96 general admission, or $55.11 with Armory Show admission

 

3. Spring Break Art Show

Spring/Break is one of the Armory Week attractions I try not to miss, it unapologetically has fun with art – blocking out the cynical in favor of its ‘Look at what I did Ma’ art school vibe.  This years curatorial theme is BLACK MIRROR – exhibiting  autobiographical artworks that engage, defy or uphold the idea that art should ‘hide the artist’.  The fair has moved from Moynihan Station to a their New Location, 4 Times Square, NYC (entrance on 43rd Street). Hopefully, the new space retains that feeling of being sent off to the races – with a familiar three-floor execution of exhibits – room after room of romping and art browsing. The rooms can be a showdown of hit-or-miss aesthetics, but I continue to enjoy the discovery beyond each door.

 

March 2–7
Skylight at Moynihan Station, 421 8th Avenue at West 31st Street
Wednesday–Sunday 11:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.; Monday 11:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
$15 general admission

 

4. Scope

SCOPE NY brings an array of contemporary art from the hottest new artists on the scene. SCOPE used to be close to Armory – there was nothing like being able to stroll, and not UBER to the main fair. The 17th edition of SCOPE returns to a new Chelsea location at Metropolitan Pavilion, the venue will host 60 international galleries and a focused schedule of special events, performances and talks.

Erik Jones, Joseph Gross Gallery

Erik Jones, Joseph Gross Gallery

March 3–5, 2017
Friday-Saturday 11:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.; Sunday 11:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m.
Metropolitan Pavilion West 60 galleries, 639 W 46th Street
$25 general admission

 

5. Art on Paper

Art on Paper returns to Manhattan’s Lower East Side in March 2016, building on the success of the fair’s inaugural 2015 edition. It may be further away from the main fair, but it’s well worth the trip to see how artists are transforming paper into extraordinary works of art.  We’re especially looking forward to the lineup from exhibitors Paradigm Gallery + Studio, representing our home base, Philadelphia, PA.

Courtesy of Art on Paper

Courtesy of Art on Paper

March 2–5
Opening Night – Thursday 6:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m.; Friday–Saturday, 11:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
Pier 36, 299 South Street on the East River
$25 general admission

 

6. ADAA Art Show

29th edition, of the Art Dealers Association of America’s annual fair, is back at that glorious Park Avenue Armory space.  With 72 exhibitors of fine art.  The 2017 show will include a number of first-time exhibitors, including Fergus McCaffrey, who will present works by Viennese artist Birgit Jürgenssen; James Fuentes, who will juxtapose works by Tamuna Sirbiladze and Noam Rappaport; Hosfelt Gallery, who will highlight four decades of work by Argentinian artist Liliana Porter; and Casey Kaplan, who will present paintings by American artist Sarah Crowner.

Courtesy of the ADAA

Courtesy of the ADAA

March 1–6
Wednesday–Friday 12:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.; Saturday 12:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.
Park Avenue Armory, Park Avenue at East 67th Street
$25 general admission

 

7. Independent

Don’t’ go looking for the Independent in Chelsea, the fair has taken up residence in Tribeca’s Spring Studios.  The popular fair’s niche market is international galleries and non-profit institutions.

March 3–5, 2017
Thursday 6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m (VIP); Friday and Saturday 12:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 p.m.–6:00p.m.
Spring Street Studios, 50 Varick Street
$25 general admission/$15 for students

 

8. Clio Art Fair

CLIO ART FAIR is a curated fair created with the idea of discovering independent artists and showcasing the careers and achievements of already affirmed creative minds. Labeled the “anti-fair for independent artists,” Clio provides a showcase for artists without gallery representation, selected for inclusion in the fair by a panel of judges.
March 3–6
Thursday 6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m., Friday and Saturday 10:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
508–526 West 26th St.
Free

 

Your Art Fair Guide for Armory Week 2016

It’s Armory Week and that means gaggles of art fairs will be taking place across New York City.  It’s going to be a whirlwind of amazing art from all over the world, informative talks and lots of Art Star Selfies.  We don’t suggest you try to tackle every fair, choose the ones that interest you the most and pace yourself. Fair fatigue is real–trying to see more art than your brain can process at one time will just ruin the whole experience. Trust us on this… Oh, and by all means, wear comfortable shoes.

 

1. Armory Show

The Armory Show is the daddy of all the fairs.  It’s the big Kahuna with over 200 galleries showing on Piers 92 & 94 for four days of incredible art, engaging talks and daring projects. Walking through both piers can be exhausting, take breaks, and check your coat.  The coat line is so long – one would think they were giving out free drinks – but it’s worth the hands-free next few hours.

DON’T MISS: Brooklyn’s Pierogi gallery will show Jonathan Schipper’s Slow Motion Car Crash, a “choreographed collision” timed to occur during the five-day fair.

jonathan schipper

Jonathan Schipper, Slow Motion Car Crash. Photo: Courtesy The Armory Show.

March 3–6, 2016
Thursday–Sunday 12:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Pier 94 and Pier 92, 711 12th Avenue between West 55th Street and West 52nd Street
$45 general admission, or $60 with VOLTA admission

 

2. Volta NY

Volta is Armory’s sister fair – one that keeps getting better in terms of curation.  Its’ art boutique feel is a refreshing change from the chaos that will be happening at Pier 92 & 94 with the Armory crowd. By spotlighting artists through primarily solo projects, VOLTA NY refocuses the art fair experience back to its most fundamental point: the artists and their works.

The Volta fair takes place at Pier 90. Photo: David Williams, courtesy Volta.

The Volta fair takes place at Pier 90.
Photo: David Williams, courtesy Volta.

March 2–6, 2016
Wednesday 8:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m.; Thursday through Saturday 12 p.m.–8:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Pier 90, 711 12th Avenue at West 48th Street
$22.96 general admission, or $55.11 with Armory Show admission

 

3. Spring Break Art Show

Spring/Break is one of the Armory Week attractions I try not to miss, it unapologetically has fun with art – blocking out the cynical in favor of its ‘Look at what I did Ma’ art school vibe.  This year, the annual curator-driven art show, chose ⌘COPY⌘PASTE” as its theme.  We’re still sad the fair had to move out of the Old School on Mott Street in Nolita (making way for a depressing condo development), to the Moynihan Station. The new space retains that feeling of being sent off to the races – with a familiar three-floor execution of exhibits – room after room of romping and art browsing. The rooms can be a showdown of hit-or-miss aesthetics, but I continue to enjoy the discovery beyond each door.

Installation by Taezoo Park, curated by Peter Gynd.

Installation by Taezoo Park, curated by Peter Gynd.

March 2–7
Skylight at Moynihan Station, 421 8th Avenue at West 31st Street
Wednesday–Sunday 12:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.; Monday 12:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
$10 general admission for advance tickets, $15 at the door

 

4. Scope

SCOPE NY brings an array of contemporary art down to the Piers. Thank goodness SCOPE is staying close to the Armory Show again – nothing like being able to stroll, and not UBER to the main fair. This year they’re promising a new “open-plan” layout and 60 international exhibitors.

Erik Jones, Joseph Gross Gallery

Erik Jones, Joseph Gross Gallery

March 3–6, 2016
Thursday 6:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m.; Friday–Sunday 11:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.
Metropolitan Pavilion West 60 galleries, 639 W 46th Street
$35 general admission

 

5. Pulse

Last year, PULSE New York was a bit of a snooze fest. This year the fair is back at its normal location,  Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 West 18th Street.   With the focus on a smaller scale – 45 galleries from four continents.  Hopefully this tightly curated content will play out better than last year’s hodge-podge.

Pulse Art Fair NYC Front Entrance

Pulse Art Fair NYC Front Entrance

March 3–6
Thursday 1:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 11:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.; Sunday 11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
The Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 West 18th Street
$25 general admission

 

6. Art on Paper

Art on Paper returns to Manhattan’s Lower East Side in March 2016, building on the success of the fair’s inaugural 2015 edition. It may be further away from the main fair, but it’s well worth the trip to see how artists are transforming paper into extrodinary works of art.  We’re especially looking forward to the lineup from first-time exhibitors Paradigm Gallery + Studio, representing Philadelphia, PA.

Courtesy of Art on Paper

Courtesy of Art on Paper

March 3–6
Thursday 6:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m.; Friday–Saturday, 11:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
Pier 36, 299 South Street on the East River
$25 general admission

 

7. ADAA Art Show

28th edition, of the Art Dealers Association of America’s annual fair, is back at that glorious Park Avenue Armory space.  With 72 exhibitors of fine art.  Newcomers include Hauser & Wirth, presenting works by the Modernist Italian sculptor, installation artist, and poet Fausto Melotti, and Tilton Gallery, showing new sculptures by Chicago-born artist Simone Leigh, whose work explores female African-American subjectivity.

Courtesy of the ADAA

Courtesy of the ADAA

March 2–6
Wednesday–Friday 12:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.; Saturday 12:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.
Park Avenue Armory, Park Avenue at East 67th Street
$25 general admission

 

8. Independent

Dont’ go looking for the Independent in Chelsea, the fair has taken up residence in Tribeca’s Spring Studios.  The popular fair’s niche market is international galleries and non-profit institutions.

March 3–6, 2016
Thursday 6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 12:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 p.m.–6:00p.m.
Spring Street Studios, 50 Varick Street
$25 general admission/$15 for students

 

9. Clio Art Fair

CLIO ART FAIR is a curated fair created with the idea of discovering independent artists and showcasing the careers and achievements of already affirmed creative minds. Labeled the “anti-fair for independent artists,” Clio provides a showcase for artists without gallery representation, selected for inclusion in the fair by a panel of judges.
March 3–6
Thursday 6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m., Friday and Saturday 10:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
508–526 West 26th St.
Free

10. New City Art Fair

This small contemporary Asian art fair, which focuses on emerging artists, is now in its fifth year.

March 3–6
Thursday 11:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 11:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
hpgrp Gallery New York, 434 Greenwich Street
Free

CHECKING OUT THAT SPRING/BREAK ART SHOW VIBE

This year, the annual curator-driven art show, Spring/Break chose Transaction as its theme.  That was executed sweetly during the press conference when co-founders Ambre Kelly & Andrew Gori got married at the top of the stairs in a endearingly funny ceremony, where the bride took a phone call in the middle of her vows, directing a wine distributor to the loading dock of their after party location.

Spring/Break is one of the Armory Week attractions I try not to miss, it unapologetically has fun with art – blocking out the cynical in favor of its ‘Look at what I did Ma’ art school vibe.  This year it moved out of the Old School on Mott Street in Nolita (making way for a depressing condo development), to the Moynihan Station.  The new space retained that feeling of being sent off to the races – with a familiar three-floor execution of exhibits – room after room of romping and art browsing.  The rooms can be a showdown of hit-or-miss aesthetics, but I continue to enjoy the discovery beyond each door.

Here’s a list of the rooms we loved walking thru.

Free ft. Oliver Jeffers curated by Marc Azoulay

We caught artist Olivers Jeffers in the midst of his dipping performance.  Jeffers and his assistants fill a custom built box with gallons of colored paint – the painting is then submerged and lifted out. It’s positioned over a thick sheet of paper impregnated with Jeffer’s handwritten words – excerpts from the sitters interview – these too disappear beneath the spread of the paint.  An esthetically pleasing yet haunting reminder that words too like images can be a fading memory.

Photo Mar 03, 5 04 25 PM

Oliver Jeffers, Dipped Painting Performance

 

Bazaar Teens curated by Dustin Yellin

I found Dustin Yellin nailing stale bread to a wall in a dank and musty room that carried nauseating smells of dirt, and coffee. He smiled and shrugged his shoulders when I asked him what was going on. “Go in and find out,” he said.  I went through the maze of rooms taking it all in, and laughing to myself at the reactions of the other onlookers.  After stepping outside into the hallway, I googled it, reading quickly as I navigated the space a second time. Apparently, Yellin shredded ten grand from an anonymous donor.  The shredded money I saw being collaged onto canvases painted the shade of poop by artists clad in white plastic jumpsuits were going to be sold for ten grand a pop and the money used to send artists in need to school. I wondered if it was all a stunt, who would buy them, and praytell whose bright idea it was to paint canvases the shade of crap.

I don’t care what it was supposed to mean – I had fun nailing bread to the wall with Yellin and watching the mayhem ensue.

 

Photo Mar 03, 3 41 45 PM

Photo Mar 03, 3 44 47 PM

Bazaar Teens installation, curated by Dustin Yellin

The Dead People Dead Flowers / Anne Nowak curated by Cassandra M. Johnson

Nowak collects dead flowers from graveyards and makes cyanoprints  – breathing new life into the flowers, she gives the sentiments of the living more time for the ones passed on.

Anne Nowak_Photo Mar 03, 6 44 58 PM

Installation by Anne Nowak, curated by Cassandra M. Johnson

Anne Nowak_Photo Mar 03, 6 41 34 PM

Installation by Anne Nowak, curated by Cassandra M. Johnson

Mail Art by Riitta Ikonen, curated by Yulia Topchiy

Over the past 11  years, Riitta Ikonen has been sending her grad school professor postcards constructed from a wide range of materials.  This visual diary of tangible objects defies what you think can be posted through the mail system.  They’re not an ordinary range of objects, but a thoughtful documentation of materials that reference the specifics of her time and locale.

Mail Art_Photo Mar 03, 6 11 56 PM

Mail art by Riitta Ikonen, curated by Yulia Topchiy

Mail Art_Photo Mar 03, 6 11 16 PM

Mail art by Riitta Ikonen, curated by Yulia Topchiy

 

Greed is Good / Fall on Your Sword curated by Andrew Gori & Ambre Kelly

Greed Is Good is an ‘immersive audio/visual wizard of oz-like spectacle of flying Champagne bottles, a giant sphere, original FOYS score and video’ based on Gordon Gecko’s speeches in Oliver Stone’s 1987 film, Wall Street.

Fall On Your Sword_Photo Mar 03, 6 57 27 PM (1)

Fall On Your Sword, “Greed Is Good,” curated by Andrew Gori & Ambre Kelly

 

After the Fire is Gone Installation by Cate Giordano, curated by Eve Sussman & Simon Lee

Photo Mar 03, 6 50 21 PM (2)

Installation by Cate Giordano, curated by Eve Sussman & Simon Lee

Cate Giordano_Photo Mar 03, 6 52 03 PM

Installation by Cate Giordano, curated by Eve Sussman & Simon Lee

Form & Formlessness: Objects and the Body curated by Peter Gynd

Taezoo Park

Installation by Taezoo Park, curated by Peter Gynd

Taezoo Park_Photo Mar 03, 6 14 39 PM

Installation by Taezoo Park, curated by Peter Gynd

Annulus curated by Corey Oberlander and Lindsey Stapleton

Leah Piepgras_Photo Mar 03, 6 29 22 PM

Leah Piepgras under Cloud Mantle, curated by Corey Oberlander & Lindsey Stapleton

Photo Mar 03, 6 33 27 PM

Leah Piepgras _Cloud Mantles, curated by Corey Oberlander & Lindsey Stapleton

Christine Sciulli’s “Propulsion Field 4022″ light installation, curated by Tracy Causey Jeffrey

Christine Sciulli_Photo Mar 03, 6 34 34 PM

Christine Sciulli’s “Propulsion Field 4022″ light installation, curated by Tracy Causey Jeffrey

 

Top 5 Art Shows of 2014

There was no polling of art aficionados, no pouring over magazines or newspaper reviews, and there’s definitely no big ballin’ art plays for likability listed below.  These shows made the list because I visited them more than once (that rarely ever happens) or my sensibilities were totally confounded by the creativity.  Shows that make that kind of impression can provide a year’s worth of conversational tidbits and a measure to which you might hold all others.  Aw, enough with that…these shows rocked my 2014.

Spring Break Art Show

It’s fun, fresh, and daring like newly graduated art school minds before they get crushed and compromised. This curator driven show, gets set up in an old schoolhouse during Armory Arts Week in New York. Yes, we know it’s technically an art fair. But the 2014 show, PublicPrivate won us over with installations that we talked up all-year-long.

Kara Walker: A Subtlety or the Marvelous Sugar Baby

Kara Walker’s Installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn was a “homage to the unpaid and overworked Artisans who have refined our sweet tastes from the cane fields to the Kitchens of the New World on the Occasion of the demolition of the Domino Sugar Refining Plant.” The exhibit was mind-blowing – from the overwhelmingly beautiful conceptual execution of the sugar-coated sphinx-like woman, to the very unexpected nauseating smell of burnt sugar permeating the hot factory.

A photo posted by @hahamag on

Swoon: Submerged Motherlands

Swoon’s intricate wheat-paste portraits normally grace New York buildings, but for Motherlands she went large-scale, telling landscaped stories against a backdrop of dramatically blue washed walls in the Brooklyn Museum rotunda. The star of the show was the massive sculptural tree that nearly kissed the rotunda’s 72 foot high glass domed ceiling.

David Lynch: The Unified Field

Lynch’s grime aesthetics found solace at Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia (PAFA), where he studied as an advanced painting student in 1967. The exhibit explored Lynch’s hybrid collection of works, displaying a delicate balance from disturbing narratives to richly descriptive lithographs. Unified Field is his world of opposites that he wanders in and out of at will.

Interhaven: The Works of Caitlin McCormack

McCormack’s sorted things in shadowboxes lay posed and gracefully still as if they once knew air – their layers of articulated overlapping crocheted beige string bones resembled the things they never were. The show’s curio layout carried a pleasantly haunting tone, but it was the lingering of McCormack’s stored memories seen through these tangible manifestations of contained dreams and nightmares that left me feeling domed under her bell jars.

*thank you to paperclips215 & Paradigm Gallery for the use of their Instagram Photos