Spotlight: Meet Photographer Ayana V. Jackson

Meet Photographer Ayana V. Jackson

 

Ayana V. Jackson is an US American photographer, filmmaker, and contemporary artist based between Johannesburg, New York and Paris.

Jackson restages colonial-era photographs in a series of digitally-collaged images in which she photographs herself moving through past and future themes, invoking social identity narratives. The captivating sepia tinted moments are told through period costume, demonstrative body language and her knowledge of historical lore.

Assuming the place of the original sitters helps Jackson to critique the historical significance of African-Americans in the history of photography, during the rise of European colonialism.  As well, as to identify the significant themes in the continuing struggle to interrogate their structures.

In this contemporary realm of art, Jackson digs deep into African-American and African diaspora experiences, giving new life to older narrations by performing stories see wants to see, and in turn granting the viewer a new way to reconstruct the fabric of expression.

 

‘To Kill or Allow to Live’ eyes closed, looking inward toward the Black Lives Matter movement (hands up), and expressing Blind Justice and Dodging Justice.

 

Grow on:

 

Ayana V. Jackson | Medium: Photography | Website | Facebook | Ayana V. Jackson is represented by Gallery MoMo & Mariane Ibrahim Gallery

Meet Photographer Ayana V. Jackson

Meet Photographer Ayana V. Jackson

 

 

 

 

Discover: Yoan Capote

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Self-portrait (each one of us) 2002 to 2008 | Concrete and cast bronze |175 x 50 x 50 cm | Yoan Capote

 

Cuban artist, Yoan Capote peeks our interest with sculpture work that creates harmony between materials that stand in stark contrast in the face of their duality.  It might be what draws you to his work; but Capote mentioned in an interview that the materials don’t determine his work. “Ideas are critical to my deciding which materials to use…Whenever you have something interesting to convey, you look for the ideal way to express it.”*

His visual metaphors are striking; the chords of his work strike emotional tones of compassion, a connect with our humanity, and a sight into our fragility.  One of our favorites pieces is Self-Portrait.  In Self-Portrait, Capote used molds of real bones with provenance from different dead people; then, he reproduced each one of them in wax, adjusting them and creating the representation of a new subject in that sculpture. The weight of the concrete is used like a symbolic element. Equilibrium is a metaphor of struggle and resistance. Gravity reminds the spiritual weight that everyone supports and talks about fragility of our own life.

Discover more on Yoan Capote: Website

 

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New Man 2014 Real handcuffs, cast bronze and stainless steel structure | 221.5 x 61 x 46 cm | Yoan Capote

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*quote comes from Capote interview with Phyllis Tuchman
– description of Self Portrait and photos from the artist