Bella Umbrella by Tim Tadder

Bella Umbrella Tim Tadder

Bella Umbrella Tim Tadder

Bella Umbrella Tim Tadder

‘Bella Umbrella’ is another breathtaking personal series by talented image maker Tim Tadder.

“Combining vintage umbrellas and fashions, with military smoke. A personal art series bringing together items never combined in a series. Images were shot on large format digital for display prints.”

Wardrobe: Julia Reeser, Umbrella by Bella Umbrella, Hair and Make by Dezi V and Natalie Bohlin.

via [Inspiration Grid]

Bella Umbrella Tim Tadder

Bella Umbrella Tim Tadder

Bella Umbrella Tim Tadder

 

Spotlight: Photographer Carrie Mae Weems

Carrie Mae Weems, 2013 MacArthur Fellow_ Credit: John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

American photographer and video artist, Carrie Mae Weems works with text, fabric, audio, digital images, and installation video but is best known for her work in the field of photography. Weems’s gift for storytelling enables her to investigate the intricacies of family relationships and gender roles, as well as the histories of racism, sexism, class and political systems.

In her Kitchen Table Series, she staged these snips of everyday domesticity and stretched them into long unspooling questions about our identity within relationships. Within every stunning black & white image of a sparse kitchen, Weems fills up the space with astute introspection into connected themes and human experiences.

“The camera gave me an incredible freedom. It gave me the ability to parade through the world and look at people and things very, very closely,” Weems reveals. This ability to embody the spirit of her stories makes her work transcendent, moving across time and place as only the soul can.

Carrie Mae Weem The Kitchen Table Series Carrie Mae Weem The Kitchen Table Series Carrie Mae Weem The Kitchen Table Series

“The Kitchen Table Series is not simply a voice for African-American women, but would be a voice for more generally all women… these ideas about the spaces of domesticity has historically belonged to women. It is sort of the site of the battle around the family, the battle around monogamy, the battle around polygamy, the battle between the sexes – it’s going to be played out in that space.  It begs the question, ‘how do we begin to alter the domestic space’?  How does the social contract get changed?

In helping us seek a shared connection with traditional narratives, –this relationship between power and aesthetics magnifies Weems own truths; her spirit captured there in the lens.

Carrie Mae Weem The Kitchen Table Series

Carrie Mae Weems [official website] [Facebook]

The More You Know:

  • Carrie Mae Weem’s, The Kitchen Table Series.
  • Guggenheim Museum’s website hosts videos featuring live performances, an all-star cast joined Carrie Mae Weems to celebrate the spirit and ideas found within Weems’s photography and video works.

The Lobster Cars of Cape Porpoise Harbor

Floating in still waters in the harbors of Maine, these lobster cars stand still and morose like Ulf Puder paintings; depicting haunting environments, pops of color and geometrical construction of shapes that draw you in.  These serene moments were taken by photographer Chris Becker out on Cape Porpoise Harbor in Maine.  Devoid of a human presence, Becker captures a graceful stillness in these quiet moments between twilight and the coming darkness.

Chris Becker Lobster Cars

Chris Becker Lobster Cars

Chris Becker Lobster Cars

Chris Becker Lobster Cars

Chris Becker Lobster Cars

Chris Becker Lobster Cars

Chris Becker Lobster Cars

Chris Becker [Website, Facebook]

photos courtesy of Chris Becker’s Behance page.

Temptation of Void: Bizarre Family Phototraits by Alexei Sovertkov

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These bizarre family portraits feel like a young Jules Verne worked his way through school at a Sears portrait studio – exploring the unknown within us before he ventured out into the world – and I kind of dig it.

Moscow-based photographer, Alexei Sovertkov, calls the series “Temptation of Void”, it explores voidness as a quality of consciousness. I love the  coupling of people & animals as it visually gives context to the ties of the human in relation to the non-human, each one seemingly isolated from the other underneath fishbowls makes me think of the aspects of our individual experiences.

Sovertkov clearly keeps his sense of humor in the quandary,  you can see IKEA stickers still affixed on the bottom of these fishbowls revealing the subjects bemused expressions at the whole experiment – whatever that might actually be.

“Voidness as a mental state, means a mode of perception in which one neither adds anything to nor takes anything away from what is present, noting simply, “There is this.” This mode is achieved through a process of intense concentration, coupled with the insight that notes more and more subtle levels of the presence and absence of disturbance.” – Alexei Sovertkov

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Discover: Rune Guneriussen

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Norwegian conceptual artist Rune Guneriussen creates whimsical worlds that highlight the natural beauty of his chosen locales. Integrating everyday, man-made objects into his work, Guneriussen assembles temporary, site-specific sculptures that he photographs using a analog plate camera.

It can take days before he finds the perfect secluded location. Items are hauled there by foot and arranged to sit within the perfect balance of light, illuminated by what Guneriussen refers to as the ‘blue hour’. Once the image is taken, he quickly dismantles the work, leaving no trace of it behind.

“As an artist he believes strongly that art itself should be questioning and bewildering as opposed to patronizing and restricting…he does not want to dictate a way to the understanding of his art, but rather indicate a path to understanding a story,” Guneriussen states in the third person on his website.

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Discover more of Guneriussen’s work:
Website \ Facebook

Insomnia: Sandro Giordano’s Photo Series ‘Bodies with no Regret’

I’m currently losing sleep over the work of photographer, Sandro Giordano.  The malarkey is all detailed in his Instagram where broken bodies fall almost hilariously over themselves and into ridiculous scenes where the quest to hold onto material possessions has some serious consequences. The photo series, In Extremis, was born out of a firsthand experience with this pitfall. Giordano himself suffered a fall while riding his bicycle. As he fell, he held onto an object in his hand instead of using his hands to stop his fall. A few weeks later, a friend broke his leg on some rocks while trying to avoid dropping his smartphone in water.

It’s gold – once you start peering into these insanely detailed sets, your mind will wander effortlessly into playing out the scenario of how his victims met their twisty tragic ends. Giordano states: “My photos tell the stories of people who live life at an exhausting pace, experiencing sudden blackouts. When the demands of the modern world become too much to cope with, our body rebels against our brain wreaking havoc in our day-to-day life.”

 

Still Sober/Rome 2015

84 Perry Street/New York

Till Death Do Us Part/Calcata 2015

Happy Birthday to Me/Rome, 2014

Where You Run/New York, 2015

Solo_Per_Amore-650x650More info: Instagram | Facebook
All images © Sandro Giordano

Insomnia with: @maisiecousins

I keep a list of internet phenomena I hear people rave over, that hit top ten lists, that get featured in zines I pick up at random.  Then I wait till I have a typical bout of insomnia, lay in bed and troll through them.  Sometimes it’s just superficial website browsing that leads me to something unusual.  The moment always feels charged and I’m determined to write a quirky, late night post about it, but that’s normally right before I start drooling and pass out on the keyboard.

Tonight – no today, right? Anyway, the Instagram account of London-based photographer Maisie Cousins (@maisiecousins) is kinda what I want to gush about.  At first glance, it seems like a throwaway.  Matter of fact, I think I immediately wondered what all the fuss was about. But, hey, I’m punch drunk and unable to sleep so what else was I going to do after successfully failing to fool myself into thinking I could comprehend Tolkien at this time in the morning.

Cousins’s work is creepy.  I think I should say unsettling because that eludes to still being approachable doesn’t it?

I stop thinking randomly about what I think I know and delve further what I don’t in attempts to attach myself to a feeling.  I wonder what dog-eared book of essays fires off in her head during a shot?  What tube station does she regularly get off at?  Because I want to think about what part of London inspires her most.

I feel like I’m looking at stills from my beloved John Water movies (Divine) and takes from old seventies mod psychedelic Londoner movies (free thinking babes with liberal morals).  These pics are all so messed up ‘good’, like the beginning a good buzz.  Another sleepy gaze and I can see it’s a photo log of feminist tropes in art school formats – she’s got a voice, it’s angsty and pure and filtered through a mind aiming to log in thought-provoking gender art in a way that’s never seen.  That’s what we all think before graduation and a couple of art fairs.

Bold and uncontrolled, not unlike the newer underground art Instagram’s I stumble across – this one’s got sexy unshaven legs and she doesn’t care if you see them.

Ok, it’s sharing time.

Lil friend 🐌

A photo posted by MAISIE 💋 (@maisiecousins) on

An old webcam pic from when I was really sad A photo posted by MAISIE 💋 (@maisiecousins) on

Real good set up @irisimc great sheep bed

A video posted by MAISIE 💋 (@maisiecousins) on

A photo posted by MAISIE 💋 (@maisiecousins) on

Camo

A photo posted by MAISIE 💋 (@maisiecousins) on

A photo posted by MAISIE 💋 (@maisiecousins) on

‘ROLLER DERBY KISSES’ SPORTS BEAUTIFUL BRUISES

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Riikka Hyvönen 2015

 

It’s that old saying come to light, “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder”.  In this case, artist Riikka Hyvönento finds beauty in a roller derby girls’ occupational hazard turned accidental canvas.  Inspired by the feminist, communal spirit of the sport her work reflects the community, fragility, and personal strength of the women who play it.

Roller Derby is high-octane, aggressive, physically demanding competitive contact speed skating sport that originated in the United States (hello Philly Roller Derby Girls).  One gnarly side effect is the technicolor rainbow of bruises the players sport after a particularly rough game.  Bruising is a trophy in this sport – a proudly earned right of passage from a well-played game. 

Hyvönen spent the last year collecting photographs of roller derby girls’ bottoms and converting the bruises – which she calls ‘kisses’ – in giant pop artworks.

“I am objectifying these women totally. But I am doing it exactly in the way they objectify themselves,” Hyvönen says.

“The players fall, and although it hurts, they get up smiling: after the match they are immensely proud of their bruises. Posting photos online and competing in who’s got the most colorful, biggest bruise, is a phenomenon: it would be a shame if no one saw the sign of bravery after a well-played game.

Hyvönen portrays the feminist, communal spirit as one of the essential characteristics of the sport. Even the titles of her works are inspired by the comments posted under the photos the girls have shared on social media:

Oh, Lord. Is That the One That Looks Suspiciously Like My Wheel?! God, I’m Sorry To Have Marked You So :( … Um, Think Of It As A Love Bite? xx” – The Finnish Institute in London

‘Roller Derby Kisses’ is part of an exhibition at the Finnish Institute in King Cross, London, it will run until August 20, 2015.

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Riikka Hyvönen 2015

 

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Riikka Hyvönen 2015

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Riikka Hyvönen 2015

 

SET IN THE STREET: The Ultimate Selfie Zone


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Set in the Street is an ongoing art project started by Photographer, Justin Bettman.  Bettman, a 23-year-old California native was looking for a way to save money on studio space. He and his collaborator Gözde Eker, starting kicking around ideas until they decided “Why don’t we try to shoot these outside?”

Their work questions our perspective — a trick of the eye. At first glance, on close inspection the scene played out before you seems normal. But when you’re pulled back and you see the entire picture, that’s when you realize you only had half a story.

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The sets they use for the shoots are foraged from unwanted furniture and materials, most of which they find on the street. After shooting the initial photos, the sets are left up on the street with a sign that invites folks to shoot their own photos and post them using the hashtag #setinthestreet.

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set in the street

photos via Justin Bettman/Setinthestreet.com

Acid Mass by Joanne Leah

Brooklyn Photographer Joanne Leah left us the most unusual message accompanied by photos from her latest series ‘Acid Mass’.

The photographs were an array of unclothed bodies strewn about in colorful backdropped narratives — a mysterious trip through surreal, fairy tale crime scenes. Her ritualistic images draw from her own childhood memories, exploring themes of isolation, detachment and self identity.

The series would not be complete if we did not include that eerie opening that grabbed us at first read…

“When I was a child, I would explore the woods behind my house. I ventured alone, following a small creek. One winter day, I deviated from my usual path. As I walked, I heard a man shout. A pack of barking dogs ran toward me. I immediately dropped to the snowy ground and pretended to be dead. I held my breath. The dogs surrounded me, sniffed and snorted. I had never felt that kind of fear before, the fear of being eaten alive.”

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All images © Joanne Leah

Photographer Seemingly Preserves His Subjects in Honey

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Blake Little photographs his subjects (ranging in age from 2 – 85 years) covered in gallons of honey – dripping and shining – caught in encapsulating moments of movement and stillness. The shots have the appearance of excavation photos; humans encased in amber suspended in time, evoking a preservation of humanity.

“Preservation began through a process of experimenting with honey. Initially, I started shooting the way it pours and drips on just the face or specific areas of the body. After several sessions, it became clear that completely covering the figure as much as possible and with varying thicknesses created a quality that I had never seen before. The honey has a way of diffusing the personal qualities of the subjects, often making them unrecognizable and democratizing their individual traits into something altogether different and universal.” [Source]

Blake Little’s exhibition Preservation opens at the Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles on March 7th and runs through April 18th.

KOPEIKIN GALLERY
2766 S. La Cienega Blvd.
The Preservation Book will also be available at preservationbook.com.

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DesignBoom

Haunting Double Exposure Portraits Give A Delicious Slip Out of Reality

Some of the best mistakes in photography are double exposures…or so I think. It’s like being caught in a parallel universe…stuck somewhere in between the places you’ve been and the places you dream about. As if you could be grounded one second and take flight the next.

Enter the haunting layering of untold stories seen through London-based photographer Julia Fullerton-Batten‘s double exposure portraits. Fullerton-Batten is known for using cinematic lighting, and beautiful backgrounds to frame her subjects in a aura of intimacy and grace.  These double exposure prints are from Batten’s personal collection… in her bio “She insinuates visual tensions in her fine-art images, and imbues them with a hint of mystery, that combine to tease the viewer to re-examine the picture continuously, each time seeing more content and finding a deeper meaning with every viewing.”

These photographs are no exception.

Julia Fullerton-Batten Website

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via mymodernmet