Caitlin McCormack Stitches Together Memory In Her Solo Show MNEMOSYNE

MNEMOSYNE – Mne·mos·y·ne \ni-ˈmä-sə-nē, -zə-\- memory

A memory is what is left when something happens and does not completely unhappen. -Edward de Bono

In a room of silent things, everything whispers as Philadelphia artist, Caitlin McCormack’s solo show Mnemosyne explores the mind’s attempt to reconstruct fragile remnants of memories before they are tainted.

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McCormack sets the tone of the show with various cabinets of curiosities – drawers open to reveal slumbering stitches arranged in categorical boundaries yet to be defined, beveled shadow frames.  Within this realm, McCormack marries found threads to existing pieces, embracing the melancholy of time overlapping memory in her delicate play of intersecting loops. In the crocheted bones of her discordant creations, lay manifestations of resurrected truths and birthed falsehoods; a balance of beguiling recollections arranged in unnatural juxtapositions.

MNEMOSYNE’s sense of fragility underscores a precious attempt to preserve that which has fallen into Obscura – to present a persistence of memory, as new life is stitched together in the parameters of anamnesis where memories live as beautiful fabrications that belie a beginning and beg off an end. There exists a haunting calm within the delicate wisps trying desperately to be more than retired graces of things they never were. ‡

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Menmosyne skeleton

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“It is the second installment in a cycle of exhibitions; an examination of the consequences of my practices, as they pertain to the scrutiny of memory’s authenticity. I am drawn towards a vacuous well of recollection, in which the fibers connecting a network of truths and fabrications fade in and out of darkness, at the bottom of which resides a glimpse of memory’s mass extinction.” – Caitlin McCormack

‡version of this article was originally featured on ParadigmArts.

Mnemosyne is up at Paradigm Gallery until Friday, November 13, 2015.

*Photos courtesy of Jason Chen

‘And Then Art Walked Into The Fray’ or the less dramatic title ‘They Called it Moonshine Kingdom’

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“Moonshine Kingdom” on the side of 56 Wyckoff Avenue. Photo by London Kaye

BUSHWICK, NY – Might as well view it now, because it’s gone.  This piece featuring Sam Shakusky from Wes Anderson’s 2012 Moonrise Kingdom holding hands with Delbert Grady’s daughters from The Shining got tangled up in a bigger social conversation – and it ain’t about street art aesthetics.

Yarnbomber, London Kaye (@madebylondon) installed this 15-foot crochet mural on the side of a family’s building adjacent to the Brooklyn Flea in Bushwick.  It was put up without the family’s permission.  In all fairness, Kaye thought she had the owner’s blessing.  Rob Abner, the flea’s founder, gave Kaye permission to erect the crochet piece, Abner did not, however, ask the family if he could decorate the facade of the home.  Rightfully, the family was a bit pissed.  Matters only got worse when their interactions with Abner requesting its removal went poorly (read all about that here, on The Gothamist – where the story was first reported).

Tenant advocate and Bushwick native Will Giron’s aunt owns the property.  In frustration over the artwork being erected without consent, Giron took to Facebook to air his family’s grievances… and that’s all she wrote.  We all know that the internet loves to reblog and comment on issues like this one.

The rage isn’t about the art, the debate is really about gentrification in urban neighbourhoods – it’s not easy to shake.  The lack of permission coupled with the poor communication Giron experienced with Abner just perpetuated the larger problem at hand – a lack of awareness and burgeoning sense of entitlement the residents were feeling from the new communities moving into their neighborhoods.  The beginning of the shift is usually an influx of artists who find the low rents affordable.  They bring a certain flair to the neighborhood which then attracts developers who attract wealthier individuals. While the affect is higher property values, unfortunately, the effect is the displacement of lower-income families and small businesses.

Kaye told The Gothamist

 “The last thing I was thinking about was making somebody upset with my art. The whole thing I wanted to do was make people happy.”

Can’t help but think of the comments I’ve heard in the past questioning the validity of street art’s ability to provoke conversations on social issues…

You really should read the rest of the story at The Gothamist

Crochet Artist OLEK Wraps Homeless Shelter in India

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Here are the final images from crochet artist OLEK‘s time in New Delhi working on a massive project for the ongoing St+art Delhi Street Art Festival. Within the first few days of her arrival in India, Olek held workshops on crochet techniques with volunteers and women from several different organizations.

Olek, whose work often examines sexuality, feminist ideas and the evolution of communication is collaborated with a number of other volunteers to crochet thousands of meters of yarn and fabric at a workshop in South Extension.

This project aimed to bring attention to the temporary night shelters “Raine Basera” which have been set up throughout the city. The one-of-a-kind installation is 40ft long and 8 foot high – in the Sarai Kale Khan area of New Delhi.

Thanks to St+art Delhi, we can give you a peek at the making of her final piece.

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Ashley Blalock’s 15-Foot Tall Crochet Installations

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I cannot stop looking at Ashley Blalock‘s fiber work. Her installation: Keeping Up Appearances features some brilliant red 15-Foot Tall Crochet work that ebbs in and out of the gallery corners. Though the work itself is delicate, the building of layers in Blalocks work convey strength…the same characteristics of webs – delicate yet strong. That convention itself seems appropriate when learning that Blalocks means her crochet art to explore the female domestic sphere and “themes of discomfort and coping mechanisms to provide solace from the stress and trauma of everyday life”.

via MyModernMet

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