Os Gêmeos Design Brazil’s Airplane for the World Cup

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Brothers and graffiti artists Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo, aka Os Gêmeos, are helping the World Cup host country, Brazil celebrate in style. The duo painted the exterior of Brazil’s national team’s airplane.

It took one week and 1,200 spray paint cans to complete the portraits along the surface of the aircraft’s body.

Os Gêmeos explains that it’s “an airplane transformed into a work of art to transport the Brazilian people and the Brazilian national soccer team, placing art in people’s lives and taking our characters to the clouds.”

The project was completed in collaboration with Gol/9ine, who will continue to use the Boeing 737 for two years once the World Cup is over.

Os Gemeos on the web.

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via MyModernMet

Eduardo Kobra Brings Rodin’s The Thinker to São Paulo

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Brazilian street artist Eduardo Kobra’s new mural in Sao Paulo, brings Rodin into Brazil with a mural based on one of the most famous sculptures by the French Artist, ‘The Thinker’.

The mural is located in the east side of the city and carries Kobra’s typical style: an explosion of colors and geometric forms along with an impressive realistic painting.

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Previous walls by Kobra:

V Day Kiss / New York

Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer / Sao Paulo

Albert Einstein / LA

Mount Rushmore / LA

Aspects of Urban Life

Afro Devil's Mattress

  

When street artist Cadu Confort emailed me pictures of his drawings that he said were inspired by “aspects of his urban life”, I admit I sighed before opening any of the attachments. We repeatedly hear these well-worn terms about what stirs an artist, but rarely do we get to see it. I suppose that’s the diplomatic way of my saying – ‘saying that doesn’t necessarily mean the accompanying work reflects that’. But the more we corresponded, the more I became interested in how his work correlated to the life in Brazil he so often mentioned.

“Would you be up for shooting some pictures to show our readers what inspires you?” I asked him.

 “Sure, it will be a pleasure and a challenge. Some of my favorite places are sometimes far from home … I’ll ride my bike through the city and shoot those pics.”

He warned me that he wasn’t a professional photographer and that his camera was “shitty.”  But a few weeks later I received photos that embody that oxymoronic term “pretty-ugly’” –  they are gritty, unfocused, random scenes that depict an honesty far beyond what I could have imagined from that now altered term “aspects of urban life.”  – Ginger

The message Cadu sent along with the following photographs…

 

“There’s a gap between what inspires me and what I do with these inspirations. It’s a little hard to relate the pics with the artwork directly, because there is a strange process in transforming what I see day by day into what I do. The imagery leads me to do the artwork. I got used to all the ugly and sketchy stuff you can find in a big city. So I try to transform all those things in something ”beautiful” or funny, but the real deal is that I can’t get rid of the ugliness, the cranky faces, the visual pollution and all those ”bad” things… especially because I live in Rio and I stay far from that colorful- beach-life-rich-nature-happy-people stuff!

There are some pretty sketchy places here in Rio, and they are usually my favorite places when it comes to aesthetics, but I had problems because it’s really not cool to shoot photos of it … at least here in Rio. It’s a shame because I’d really like to show you the “worst”(as people use to say) side of the city that I love. Stuff like having a hot dog and a good chat with old hookers in Copacaba, funny kids on the streets making fun of rich people. Drunk people. Bar life. This kind of stuff you can only find in the night of big cities.” – Cheers and Abraços, OBRIGADO !  

Cadu

 

Abandoned Shopping Car

Abandoned Shopping Car

Afro Devil's Mattress

Afro Devil’s Mattress

Bad Grafitti

Bad Grafitti

Illegal Electric Wire

Illegal Electric Wire

Trash

Trash

Evil Saint

Evil Saint

Dirty Bar (Boteco)

Dirty Bar (Boteco)

Sheraton Hotel From The Bus

Sheraton Hotel From The Bus

King's Palace

King’s Palace

Lonely Security

Lonely Security

Rainy Ipanema

Rainy Ipanema

Way Back Home From The Bus

Way Back Home From The Bus

 

Wanna check out some of Cadu’s work …then click here.

Sexual Colors – Inside the mind of Gabriel Wickbold

Gabriel Wickbold

By Rayna Hewitt

Gabriel Wickbold

HAHA MAG: Where do you get the inspiration for your projects?
Gabriel Wickbold: I am a person who is influenced by the simplest things. I find that the main thing is to be sensitive enough to perceive these influences. All artists or people who work with art have to be researchers in the first place. A distinguished piece of work has to have synthesis, enough influence to represent a cultural moment. The sensuality makes peace with breaking moments. People breathe innovations all the time, and with paint they make a rethought sensuality.

When I started the Sexual Colors project, I started in a very curious way, wanting to reach a new plasticity. I find that the creation is in curiosity. We have to dare with the curiosity of bringing about a new result. Generally we are very tied to briefings and necessities of the customer, as speed and deadlines and sometimes lose the principle, which is to let the curiosity for new forms to carry through the same tasks.

HM: How much does Brazilian culture influence or drive your photosets (particularly the colors)?
GW:
Brazil is a country of very strong sex appeal. People treat the body as a very valuable thing. This has a positive and a negative side. I find that we’re more healthy, but there are many people that suffer and we place our lives at risk for intangible objects of beauty. Brazil is a very colorful country, and our projection concerning the city is an organized mess, our aesthetic and chaos. We come from immigrants of many places. We’re very rooted in our day to day, so that if this work becomes global, it’ll try to translate these references.

Gabriel Wickbold

HM: What do you think of when you shoot?
GW:
When I shoot, I tend to focus my energies on sensitivity, in order to understand when I have a result. To imagine and compose an image through references is the easy part of the of the creative process. The difficult part is to have the sensitivity to discover something new during a session.

HM: If you could be any color of paint, what color would you be?
GW:
I am very passionate for green. I find that it possesses very interesting nuances, and it translates slightly differently than blue. It seems to bring more personality.

Gabriel Wickbold

HM: Do you dream in color? What do your dreams look like? (Is there paint everywhere?)
GW:
I find that my dreams are more about nudity and sensuality. The colors come later.

HM: Your photos showcase a lot of movement and high energy.  Is this a good indicator of your personal energy level from day to day?
GW: I try to channel the maximum energy during each photo essay. It’s very tiresome to do, and it take my time and concentration. Before an essay, many people ask me if I am quiet, or if I am sad, but in reality I am concentrating. At the moment of the essay an explosion of energy and conduction must always come out of the photographs. The model is in a fragile situation; exposed. We have the mission to create a new reality, trying to manipulate the perspective, but in an indirect form; not saying, “imagine that you are in such a place.” Thus, I find that you are underestimating the condition of the model; this manipulation has to be returned to the attitude, for the way that we construe energy in a set.

Gabriel Wickbold

HM: What is a day in the life of Gabriel Wickbold like?
GW:
I am the face of many ideas, and it makes me pretty anxious. Because of this, I don’t have a car – I walk and bike. I take photos in the studio almost every day. The days where I’m not photographing, I’m searching references, treating images, or having meetings with customers. I’ve practiced squash a lot – it’s an excellent sport for alleviating stress – and I still have time for my son and my wife. I’m twenty-six years old with many responsibilities, but I’ve capsized very well lately. (laugh)

HM: Is there anyone you haven’t worked with yet that you would like to?
GW:
In 2011, I want to expand my work internationally, work more for Brazil, and use to my financial advantage this moment where the international media is being provided to me.

HM: Who are you, in five words?
GW:
Creative, passionate, enthusiastic, entrepreneur, funny.

Gabriel Wickbold

HM: What color do you think love and happiness are?
GW:
I consider those two sentiments so complex that they can be translated into a huge mix of colors.