Spotlight: Titus Kaphar

titus kaphar headshot

Titus Kaphar. (©Titus Kaphar. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York)

 

Titus Kaphar tops my list of ‘Artists to Watch’, though it seems that most of the art world had their eyes trained on him already. When it come to iconography in art, Kaphar seems to be screaming the loudest.  His series of solo shows, project and installations continue to bend and shape conversation on race, hidden histories, and our justice system – or lack thereof.

“My work is an introduction to my vocabulary,” Kaphar says. “It looks at the way I deal with history and my different modes of intervention.”

Indeed it does. Kaphar works with conceptual goals; he reimagines historical events looking for his truth.

You stand before his paintings –  these contextual Classic and Renaissance painting styles and just as your brain begins to dive into that natural art recall, a reprogramming starts.  You notice the intentional cuts, bends, and sculpts in the canvas’, reconstructing and manipulating the way people of color are seen in this version of art history. Kaphar confronts you with the possibilities of exploring new narratives – there is no onrushing of guilt or innocence an appropriating that doesn’t feel de humanizing but that challenges the originality of story that once took precedence on the canvas, until Kaphar reshaped that narrative.

 

“A painting may inspire, but it’s people who make change.”

Spotlight: Titus Kaphar, Stripes, (2014).

Titus Kaphar, Stripes, (2015) at Jack Shainman Gallery, NY

Spotlight Titus Kaphar, to be titled, (2014)

Titus Kaphar, to be titled, (2014) at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Spotlight Titus Kaphar, to be titled, (2014).

Titus Kaphar, to be titled, (2014) at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Spotlight Titus Kaphar

Drawing the Blinds (2014) at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 

Enjoy exploring these great links to more information on Kaphar:

  • Titus Kaphar website.
  • In this Time video, watch Kaphar in the process of making his oil painting, “Yet Another Fight for Remembrance” for Time Magazine’s cover of the Ferguson protests.
  • Titus Kaphar: History in the Making – a short video on his 2009 Seattle Art Museum Show
  • Dismantling History: An Interview with Titus Kaphar | Art21
  • See what engages him by taking on some books from Kaphar’s ‘Recommend Reading’.

    Feature photo of Titus Kaphar with Gift of Shrouded Descent, 2014, Oil and mixed media on canvas by Kubiat Nnamdie.

    Photos by HAHA Magazine

Spotlight: Jean-Michel Basquiat

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Jean-Michel Basquiat (December 22, 1960 – August 12, 1988) was born and raised in Brooklyn, the son of a Haitian-American father and a Puerto Rican mother. His career as a graffiti artist and musician was fostered in the 1980’s New York Art Scene. Under the pseudonym SAMO he’d leave poetical messages impregnated on city walls… “Plush safe he think’… ‘SAMO as an alternative to the bourgeois”. With his crowning of trademark dreadlocks, Basquiat was a regular downtown fixture – he’d go on to become one of the most important artists of the 20th century.

Jean-Michel is credited with introducing graffiti into the realm of fine art. His paintings are often described as childlike; dealing with human anatomy, dense imagery, and his African-American heritage. The mixture of Afrocentric themes with graffiti, anchored on canvas with his esoteric texts and symbols was unconventional and hard to ignore.

His genius trapped in a burgeoning art movement set on ‘crazed’ did nothing to help slow down the excesses he became a victim of. At the age of twenty-seven he was found dead of a drug overdose in his Great Jones loft…the Radiant Child had left his canvassed works behind screaming at the world, their many faces torturing and riveting, like his legacy. The Whitney Museum of American Art held the first retrospective of his work from October 1992 to February 1993, and in 2016 his large canvas Untitled (1982) broke auction records with a final price of $57.3 million.

“He disrupted the politics of the art world and insisted that if he had to play their games, he would make the rules. His images entered the dreams and museums of the exploiters, and the world would never be the same.” – Keith Haring

Basquiat is sometimes more commonly talked of in the context of celebrity than artistically; his friendships/collaborations with Pop Art icon Andy Warhol are still critiqued in the vortex of pop culture phenomena. But there’s so much more…

Enjoy these great links to more information on the life of Basquiat:

  • The official Basquiat website.
  • For a closer look at Basquiat works now in circulation and editorial imprints from those still inspired by the Radiant Child, try Artsy’s resource.
  • Use this link  or this one , to read ‘The Radiant Child’, Rene Ricard’s 1981 Artforum article that launched Basquiat onto the art world.
  • Watch: Basquiat, the movie directed by Julian Schnabel starring Jeffrey Wright as Basquiat.
  • Or rent, Basquiat: The Radiant Child, this Tamra Davis movie boasts never seen footage.
  • At Basquiat’s memorial, Fab 5 Freddy “interpolated” the poem ‘Genius Child’ by Langston Hughes. You can read it here.
  • For a page-turning read on Jean-Michel & the 1980s art world, try ‘Basquiat: A Quick Killing in Art‘.
  • Did you know Basquiat’s Great Jones Street Loft  was immortalized last year?
  • 1st Dibs has rare vinyl record albums with offset cover art from Jean Michel Basquiat’s band, Gray.
  • How could I forget the movie he starred in, Downtown 81 – that bizarre urban fairytale-like dream that mirrored his early life. You can stream the remastered 30th Anniversary edition on Amazon Video .
    *images Jean-Michel Basquiat in 1985 Photo: AP