Spotlight: Multimedia Artist, Rashaad Newsome

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Transfixed is how I’d describe the first time I experienced Rashaad Newsome’s work. In a white booth at The Armory Show, his video performance Shade Compositions SFMOMA looped on a flat screen. With Newsome as the maestro, this sea of performers dressed in sass, accentuated lips, flexing with scattered matching handbags started a chorus of what Newsome calls “ghetto gestures” – snapping heads back and forth, sucking teeth while saying things like “what” and “excuse-me” over and over till it built itself into a neighborhood crescendo of ‘what happens/what you hear on your block’.

I dare you to watch the video below and not understand a fraction of the fierceness.

Once I pulled myself out of the video performance, I realized the collage artwork hanging in the booth was also by Newsome. Pieces that emulated a vocabulary lived through and taught. His style is a seamless swaggering blend of urban culture and fine art – a mix of collage, video, and performance. His art is propped up on color, framed off with blingy status symbols – chrome hubcaps and heavy gold rope chain punctuate collage images that low-ride through the traditional art world culture like it owes him money.

Multimedia Artist, Rashaad Newsome Multimedia Artist, Rashaad Newsome

Some of my favorite works have been his recent art performances that focus on transforming what you think defines the popular dance form known as voguing.  In the performances, dancers perform effortlessly for the camera, showing off the skill and beauty involved in this cultured narrative.

Over the years, I’ve enjoyed watching Rashaad navigate through the art world on his terms, weighing in on more than visual terms. It allows you to realize that there is a place in the contemporary art world for an artist to give an accurate representation of the world they come from.  Inhabiting that space is the unfiltered version of creative freedom – precisely what Newsome continues to creates for the subjects he’s often inspired by.

 

 

 

Rashaad Newsome | Website | Instagram

Rashaad Newsome – Born 1979, in New Orleans, Louisiana. Lives and works in New York.

The More You Know:

  • Rashaad Newsome, Blending Hip-Hop and Heraldry | New York Times
  • Want more of Newsome’s Videos on his Vimeo
  • Rashaad Explores The History of Hip-Hop Gestures | Huffington Post
  • At NOMA (New Orleans Museum of Art): A look back at the first solo exhibition in Louisiana by renowned video, performance, and collage artist Rashaad Newsome (born 1979), Rashaad Newsome: King of Arms explores the artist’s interest in ornament, systems of heraldry, and Baroque grandeur.

Spotlight: Meet Photographer Ayana V. Jackson

Meet Photographer Ayana V. Jackson

 

Ayana V. Jackson is a US American photographer, filmmaker, and contemporary artist based in Johannesburg, New York, and Paris.

Jackson restages colonial-era photographs in a series of digitally-collaged images in which she photographs herself moving through past and future themes, invoking social identity narratives. The captivating sepia-tinted moments are told through period costume, expressive body language and her knowledge of historical lore.

Assuming the place of the original sitters helps Jackson to critique the historical significance of African-Americans in the history of photography, during the rise of European colonialism, to identify the significant themes in the continuing struggle to interrogate their structures.

In this contemporary realm of art, Jackson digs deep into African-American and African diaspora experiences, giving new life to older narrations by performing stories she wants to see, and in turn granting the viewer a new way to reconstruct the fabric of expression.

 

‘To Kill or Allow to Live’ eyes closed, looking inward toward the Black Lives Matter movement (hands up), and expressing Blind Justice and Dodging Justice.

 

Grow on:

 

Ayana V. Jackson | Medium: Photography | Website | Facebook | Ayana V. Jackson is represented by Gallery MoMo & Mariane Ibrahim Gallery

Meet Photographer Ayana V. Jackson

Meet Photographer Ayana V. Jackson

 

 

 

 

Spotlight: Kerry James Marshall

Spotlight: Kerry James Marshall black history month

Spotlight: Kerry James Marshall black history month

Kerry James Marshall was born in Birmingham, AL in 1955. He has said in the past that it was impossible for his art not to have been influenced by his birthplace.

One of Mr. Marshall’s core beliefs is that “we all stand on the shoulders of giants.” Some of his most significant influences have been classic pieces of art, their structure, and their subject matter. He developed this idea in his work and has applied many of these forces in creating his Black masterpieces.

As Mr. Marshall would walk the hall of various museums, he noticed a striking difference between the busts of African heroes and the ones of Greco-Roman heroes. There was animation, aggressiveness, and heroism in those busts, while the African pieces were static, inert, and passive. Why couldn’t Black people be depicted as the Greco-Romans were?

From that idea came modeling his subjects as superheroes. Superheroes have been mostly White through the ages, and it was one of his ways of taking back power in Black imagery. The positive associations and feeling that superheroes engender were exactly what Mr. Marshall was seeking. Strength, positivity, and heroism, long absent in representation.

For this idea, he hearkened back to his childhood and his love of superhero comic books. The irony that in this case, he stood on his own “shoulders” resurrected a long-dormant idea. There was power in the blackness that had long been hidden and questioned by the White world. He furthered this idea by depicting his figures as the blackest of black, often highlighted by his colorful backgrounds.

The other thing that struck this reporter about his art was his depictions of houses, all closed up from the outside, but inside, animated and warm. What went on behind the closed doors of Black folks? The maids, field hands, servants, slaves? What were their secret dreams and desires? To the rest of Caucasian America, this was indeed a mystery. Exposing the hidden yearnings and often sad and powerful world behind these doors is another goal of Mr. Marshall’s art. The overarching idea is that there is power and heroism in Blackness, and we need to spread the word.

“I am trying to establish a phenomenal presence that is unequivocally black and beautiful. It is my conviction that the most instrumental, insurgent painting for this moment must be of figures, and those figures must be black, unapologetically so.” — Kerry James Marshall

Spotlight: Kerry James Marshall black history month

Kerry James Marshall (American, born Birmingham, Alabama 1955)
Untitled (Studio), 2014
Acrylic on PVC panels; 83 5/16 × 119 1/4 in. (211.6 × 302.9 cm)
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Foundation Gift, Acquisitions Fund and The Metropolitan Museum of Art Multicultural Audience Development Initiative Gift, 2015

 

Spotlight: Kerry James Marshall black history month

KERRY JAMES MARSHALL, “School of Beauty, School of Culture,” 2012 (acrylic on canvas). | Collection of the Birmingham Museum of Art; Museum purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth (Bibby) Smith, the Collectors Circle for Contemporary Art, Jane Comer, the Sankofa Society, and general acquisition funds. Photo courtesy MCA Chicago

 

Learn More:

  • If you missed his latest exhibition ‘Mastery’ at The Met, not to worry, the audio guide for the show is still up on the museum’s website.  You’ll find out more about his inspirations from Renaissance masterpieces to comic books—the discussion is led by a Met curator and the artist himself as they explore details and share the remarkable stories behind select works in the exhibition.

SPOTLIGHT: MIXED MEDIA ARTIST – LAKWENA MACIVER

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Lakwena Maciver is a London-based mixed media artist who uses a kaleidoscopic colors to make her mark.   She’s part of the new generation of female British artists on the art scene – collaborating with institutions like Tate Modern, Wynwood Walls and Clinique.  Her work been has exhibited everywhere from street installations to galleries. Informed by decoration both aesthetically and conceptually, she explores the messages that decoration is used to communicate, its traditional use in worship and myth-making and how this translates into contemporary popular culture.

“Concerned with the significance of how and who we decorate, and what this reflects about our values and beliefs, Lakwena positions kaleidoscopic colours, bold pattern and adornment as powerful signifiers to redefine and reassign value and glory. Using words as both images and as anchors of meaning, she borrows from the techniques and conventions of traditional sign-writing and contemporary graphic design.”

Check her out: Website | Tumblr | Instagram

Spotlight: Titus Kaphar

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Titus Kaphar. (©Titus Kaphar. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York)

 

Titus Kaphar tops my list of ‘Artists to Watch,’ though it seems that most of the art world had their eyes trained on him already. When it comes to iconography in art, Kaphar appears to be screaming the loudest.  His series of solo shows, project and installations continue to bend and shape the conversation on race, hidden histories, and our justice system – or lack thereof.

“My work is an introduction to my vocabulary,” Kaphar says. “It looks at the way I deal with history and my different modes of intervention.”

Indeed it does. Kaphar works with conceptual goals; he reimagines historical events looking for his truth.

You stand before his paintings – these contextual classic and Renaissance painting styles and just as your brain begins to dive into that natural art recall, a reprogramming starts.  You notice the intentional cuts, bends, and sculpts in the canvas’, reconstructing and manipulating the way people of color are seen in this version of art history. Kaphar confronts you with the possibilities of exploring new narratives – there is no onrushing of guilt or innocence an appropriating that doesn’t feel dehumanizing but that challenges the originality of story that once took precedence on the canvas, until Kaphar reshaped that narrative.

 

“A painting may inspire, but it’s people who make change.”

Spotlight: Titus Kaphar, Stripes, (2014).

Titus Kaphar, Stripes, (2015) at Jack Shainman Gallery, NY

Spotlight Titus Kaphar, to be titled, (2014)

Titus Kaphar, to be titled, (2014) at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Spotlight Titus Kaphar, to be titled, (2014).

Titus Kaphar, to be titled, (2014) at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Spotlight Titus Kaphar

Drawing the Blinds (2014) at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

 

Enjoy exploring these links for more information on Kaphar:

  • Titus Kaphar website.
  • In this Time video, watch Kaphar in the process of making his oil painting, “Yet Another Fight for Remembrance” for Time Magazine’s cover of the Ferguson protests.
  • Titus Kaphar: History in the Making – a short video on his 2009 Seattle Art Museum Show
  • Dismantling History: An Interview with Titus Kaphar | Art21
  • See what engages him by taking on some books from Kaphar’s ‘Recommend Reading.’

    Feature photo of Titus Kaphar with Gift of Shrouded Descent, 2014, Oil and mixed media on canvas by Kubiat Nnamdie.

    Photos by HAHA Magazine

Spotlight: Jean-Michel Basquiat

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Jean-Michel Basquiat (December 22, 1960 – August 12, 1988) was born and raised in Brooklyn, the son of a Haitian-American father and a Puerto Rican mother. His career as a graffiti artist and musician were fostered in the 1980’s New York Art Scene. Under the pseudonym SAMO he’d leave poetical messages impregnated on city walls… “Plush safe he thinks’… ‘SAMO as an alternative to the bourgeois”. With his crowning of trademark dreadlocks, Basquiat was a regular downtown fixture – he’d go on to become one of the most important artists of the 20th century.

Jean-Michel is credited with introducing graffiti into the realm of fine art. His paintings, often described as childlike; dealing with human anatomy, dense imagery, and his African-American heritage. The mixture of Afrocentric themes with graffiti, anchored on canvas with his esoteric texts and symbols was unconventional and hard to ignore.

His genius trapped in a burgeoning art movement set on ‘crazed’ did nothing to help slow down the excesses he became a victim of. At the age of twenty-seven, he was found dead of a drug overdose in his Great Jones loft.  The Radiant Child had left his canvassed works behind screaming at the world, their many faces torturing and riveting, like his legacy. The Whitney Museum of American Art held the first retrospective of his work from October 1992 to February 1993, and in 2016 his large canvas Untitled (1982) broke auction records with a final price of $57.3 million.

“He disrupted the politics of the art world and insisted that if he had to play their games, he would make the rules. His images entered the dreams and museums of the exploiters, and the world would never be the same.” – Keith Haring

Basquiat is sometimes more commonly talked of in the context of the celebrity than artistically; his friendships/collaborations with Pop Art icon Andy Warhol still get critiqued in the vortex of pop culture phenomena. But there’s so much more.

Enjoy these excellent links for more information on the life of Basquiat:

  • The official Basquiat website.
  • For a closer look at Basquiat works now in circulation and editorial imprints from those still inspired by the Radiant Child, try Artsy’s resource.
  • Use this link or this one, to read ‘The Radiant Child,’ Rene Ricard’s 1981 Artforum article that launched Basquiat onto the art world.
  • Watch Basquiat, the movie directed by Julian Schnabel starring Jeffrey Wright as Basquiat.
  • Or rent, Basquiat: The Radiant Child, this Tamra Davis movie boasts never seen footage.
  • At Basquiat’s memorial, Fab 5 Freddy “interpolated” the poem ‘Genius Child’ by Langston Hughes. You can read it here.
  • For a page-turning read on Jean-Michel & the 1980s art world, try ‘Basquiat: A Quick Killing in Art.’
  • Did you know Basquiat’s Great Jones Street Loft was immortalized last year?
  • 1st Dibs has rare vinyl record albums with offset cover art from Jean Michel Basquiat’s band, Gray.
  • How could I forget the movie he starred in, Downtown 81 – that bizarre urban fairytale-like dream that mirrored his early life. You can stream the remastered 30th Anniversary edition on Amazon Video.
    *images Jean-Michel Basquiat in 1985 Photo: AP

Discover: Rune Guneriussen

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Norwegian conceptual artist Rune Guneriussen creates whimsical worlds that highlight the natural beauty of his chosen locales. Integrating everyday, man-made objects into his work, Guneriussen assembles temporary, site-specific sculptures that he photographs using a analog plate camera.

It can take days before he finds the perfect secluded location. Items are hauled there by foot and arranged to sit within the perfect balance of light, illuminated by what Guneriussen refers to as the ‘blue hour’. Once the image is taken, he quickly dismantles the work, leaving no trace of it behind.

“As an artist he believes strongly that art itself should be questioning and bewildering as opposed to patronizing and restricting…he does not want to dictate a way to the understanding of his art, but rather indicate a path to understanding a story,” Guneriussen states in the third person on his website.

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Discover more of Guneriussen’s work:
Website \ Facebook

WATCH JAMES FRANCO’S GOO-DRENCHED ODE TO RENAISSANCE SCULPTURE

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James Franco’s weird new performance art video, entitled “James Franco reimagined the Della Robbia,” is a  four-minute goo-drenched ode to renaissance sculpture, where people posed as sculptures, are doused in dripping clear gloss. 

Franco released the video in response to Italian Renaissance ceramics as a part of Sotheby’s Artist Response series for their show, Glazed: The Legacy of the Della Robbia.  For it, Franco reimagined the works of famous Italian Renaissance artist family, the Della Robbia, to create living icons.

Franco said: “For centuries, sculpture has been used decoratively and as iconography. The Della Robbia family created sculptures that take on both of those roles.”

“I was immediately struck by the vibrancy and shine of the glaze of the Della Robbia sculptures in this show, especially the human forms frozen in time as icons. To mimic and modernise these sculptures, I wanted to create living icons emphasising the glazing process,” he added. “I filmed them in slow motion so the viewer relishes in the passage of time and can imagine the tangible feeling of the liquid covering each living sculpture.

The show is on view at Sotheby’s New York through November 18th.

 

via [PAPER]

Surviving Black History Month

by Kimberly Drew

Black History is American History

 

A firm believer in the placebo that is a new year, I get excited as December winds down. I set my sneakers near my door with the hopes that on January 1st I’ll magically wake up and be ready to run the Boston marathon. As January creeps along I attempt to turn my resolutions into effortless routines. This year rather than vowing to lose half my body weight I decided to try something a little more useful. My resolution for 2013 was surviving Black History Month.

Now I know you’re reading and thinking this chick is crazy. Why would a black person cringe at the month that should stand for their annual dosage of 40 acres and a mule? Why? Because it’s an anxiety inducing month. Twenty-eightish days designed to encompass (and in turn pathologize) Black history.

As an undergrad at Smith College I was a scholar in African-American studies. After studying blackness around the clock the idea that Black History Month can serve it’s role in our society is a hyperbolic and insulting one. So, for all of those spirits who are plagued by the second month of the year I thought I’d outfit each of you with a Black History Month survival guide.

1

Celebrate otherness. While race is a social construct, it dictates the way that we view others and are seen by others. Accepting that you are different is the first step in guiding your way through a month that can limit your identity. A song that I’ve been using to remind myself of this fact is by a gentleman named Two Chainz.

2

Avoid advertising ploys. As Hank Willis Thomas said, “race has been the most successful marketing ploy in the history of the world.” Don’t let corporations bait you with schemes that do nothing but enforce corporate monopolies. Don’t believe me? Visit Vintage Black Ads on Tumblr to see generations of advertisements that were designed to target black audiences.

3

Read, read, read… literacy is a privilege; take head. Let Black History Month be your excuse to rediscover Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man, fall in love with Jean Toomer’s Cane or delve into the four volumes of Henry Louis Gates and David Bindman’s The Image of the Black in Western Art. There is agency seeded in every page turn and every click-through on articles about Black history.

4

Don’t watch the Grammys or the Oscars. Yeah I said it, ignore the academy at all costs. As a survivor of this year’s Grammys and Seth McFarlane’s wildly offensive take on hosting the Oscars, I can testify that it’ll do no one any good feeding into a system that works to remind women and minorities that they will never be good enough.

5

Know that Black history is American history… It’s in our best interest to celebrate different aspects of American life, see how they intersect and deconstruct our preconceived prejudices. Black History Month places Black history in a vacuum. The month should be a celebration of racial progress, cultural difference and a time to reflect on contemporary blackness. Our only hope in successfully surviving Black History Month is a universal understanding that these things are not exclusive to racial blackness.

 

*amazing gif borrowed from Tumblr staff

SPOTLIGHT: KARA WALKER

 

 Kara-Walker-Domino-Factory-Lead

Kara Walker is an American Artist known for her bold exploration of race, culture and gender and identity issues. You might not have remembered her name, but surely I can recall you to her work once I show you those explosive black silhouettes resembling paper cut-outs that she’s most known for.

Born in 1969, Walker attended the Rhode Island School of Design and has gone on to showcase her work in some of the finest museums around: MOMA, SFMOMA, Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, just to name a few. She is the youngest MacArthur recipient as well as the youngest artist to receive a retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

In 2007, Walker was listed among Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People. In the article, fellow artist Barbara Kruger summed up Walker’s work amazingly with this quote. “Walker’s vigilance has produced a compelling reckoning with the twisted trajectories of race in America. Her installations and films forcefully pluralize our notion of a singular “history.” They create a profusion of back stories and revisions that slash and burn through the pieties of patriotism and the glosses of “color blindness.” Restarting the engines of seemingly archaic methods, from the graphic effect of silhouette portraits to the machine-age ethos of film, she produces a cast of characters and caricatures with appetites for destruction and reproduction, for power and sex.”

This past year, Walker took over the historic Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn for a collaboration with Creative Time NYC.  The exhibit, ‘Subtlety or the Marvelous Sugar Baby’ was “an homage to the unpaid and overworked Artisans who have refined our sweet tastes from the cane fields to the Kitchens of the New World on the Occasion of the demolition of the Domino Sugar Refining Plant.”

The exhibit was mind-blowing – scattered throughout the space were Banana Boys, life-size statues of little boys cast in sugar resin holding baskets, dripping dark molasses inside the warm building, adding to the permeating smell of burnt sugar. But nothing could distract from the overwhelmingly beautiful conceptual execution of the sugar-coated sphinx resting at 75-feet-long and 35-feet-tall.

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Delve deeper into Kara Walker’s work with these resources:

 

*featured pic courtesy of Creative Time, all other pics taken by HAHA MAG

Represent: 200 Years of African American Art

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is highlighting their collection of works made by artists of African descent with a new publication and exhibit of the same name, Represent: 200 Years of African American Art.

Represent opened to the public, January 10, 2015. The exhibition features 75+ works culled from the museum’s holdings by consulting curator Dr. Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw, and Project Curatorial Assistant, John Vick.

For the majority of the public, many of the pieces in this exhibit have only been seen in photographs. The exhibition is a reflection of the history of race in the United States, it is also comprised of unique voices that separate themselves from categorization with their creative freedoms.

The hand of the artist weaves itself in and out of historical, social and personal conflict with narratives we try to understand; our engagement with these stories is a base for commonality. They make one think about the things that say true and unchanging – the importance of identity – finding a place of belonging that can hold an honest grounding within our individuality. The diversity of this approach can be seen in the presentation of works chosen.

Before you enter the exhibit gallery, notice the drawings of the exterior and interior of the Main Building of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, attributed to the architect Julian Abele. In 1902, Abele was the first African American to graduate from the architecture program at the University of Pennsylvania.

It’s a fitting beginning to the complexity of art that ranges in means and interpretation throughout the five groupings; Early America, Imagining Modernity, Abstract Approaches, Past Made Present, Facing the Collection.

Notable Philadelphians in the exhibit: Moses Williams, former slave and profile cutter in the household of portrait artist and first museum entrepreneur Charles Willson Peale; Henry Ossawa Tanner, whose painting The Annunciation was the first African American work to be acquired by an American Museum; Dox Thrash, a printmaker ; Sculptor, Barbara Chase-Riboud; Moe Brooke; Barkley L. Hendricks.

As you walk through the exhibit, don’t miss this unintentional conversation between – The Deposition by Bob Thompson and Present Futures by Moe Brooker. The paintings sit cattycorner to one another, sharing the same celebratory color palettes. [Thanks to DuBois Shaw for pointing that out]

Within the exhibit space, Kara Walker is the youngest artist shown. At 46, Walker is still a very relevant artist, but it’s worth pointing out that artist Jayson Musson (Gallery 124 in the permanent collection) is a younger voice that bookends the exhibition. Musson’s, Trying to find our spot off in that light, light off in the spot can be seen in the permanent collection, with a reference to it’s inclusion in the catalogue and exhibition.

Represent: 200 Years of African American Art runs until April 5, 2015. A wide variety of special events and celebratory programs are happening in conjunction with this exhibit. Learn about them here.

Our Highlights:

Horace Pippin – The End of the War: Starting Home
From afar it can seem a simple canvassed painting. But a closer inspection will reveal scenes that depict the brutality of war. Notice its framing of carved weapons, helmets, and tanks.

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Carrie Mae Weems – Untitled
Three of the twenty photographs that comprise The Kitchen Table Series are shown here (One of our Art Basel Miami highlights). Weems stages these stretched scenes into long unspoken sentences comprised of emotions and identity within relationships.
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Glenn Ligon – Untitled (I’m Turning Into a Specter before Your Very Eyes and I’m Going to Haunt You)
Stand there long enough to realize that you are re-reading a single phrase; Ligon’s repetition of this phrase begins to dissipate into a powerful message as the words begin to blur and disappears into a bigger meaning.

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Wille Cole – Reversed Evidence
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Moses Williams – Peale Family Silhouettes

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REPRESENT IMAGE 1.

SPOTLIGHT: Gordon Parks

American Photographer Gordon Parks has been called “the most important black photographer in the history of photojournalism” – the man who taught himself how to take pictures at the age of twenty-five with a Voigtländer Brillant that he purchased at a pawn shop.

In 1948, after a stint with the Farm Security Administration (F.S.A.) covering the nation’s social conditions, he garnered attention with his photo essay on the life of a Harlem gang leader that won him widespread acclaim and a place as the first African-American staff photographer and writer for Life Magazine – where he stayed for two decades. Parks work captures some of the most iconic moments in American Culture from the early 1940’s up until his death in 2006.  As a humanitarian, he seemed most passionate about capturing the nation in its moments of social upheaval with an air of timelessness. His lens so often found the dignity and pride of the people whose portraits accompanied these stories.

 

Parks was multi-faceted man – he was also a humanitarian, a musician, a film director, and a writer. “He spent much of the last three decades of his life expanding his style, conducting experiments with color photography. He continued working up until his death in 2006, winning many awards, including the National Medal of Arts in 1988, and over fifty honorary doctorates. He was also a noted composer and author, and in 1969, became the first African-American to write and direct a Hollywood feature film based on his bestselling novel The Learning Tree. This was followed in 1971 by the hugely successful motion picture Shaft. The core of his accomplishment, however, remains his photography the scope, quality, and enduring national significance of which is reflected throughout the Collection. According to Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Research Center at Harvard University, “Gordon Parks is the most important black photographer in the history of photojournalism. Long after the events that he photographed have been forgotten, his images will stay with us, testaments to the genius of his art, transcending time, place and subject.”**

You can become better acquainted with his legacy of work at The Gordon Parks Foundation.

*Come follow us on Twitter today (@hahamag #spotlightseries) as we tweet links to Gordon Park’s work online.

 

 

Gordon Parks, “Untitled,” Alabama (1956), Archival Pigment Print, 12 × 18 inches (© Gordon Parks Foundation, courtesy of the Foundation and Salon 94)

*images courtesy of Time Magazine. **quote from Biography of Parks at Gates Foundation website.