Philly Flashes Its Revolutionary Teeth with a Street Art Exhibition ft. Local Artists

Today at the South Street HeadHouse Shambles, Visit Philly held a press conference to announce the launch of a 6-week art exhibition called Revolutionary: A Pop-Up Street Art Exhibition.

Revolutionary will be a free, six-week exhibition featuring 13 works of art that interpret the spirit of revolution at 13 different sites throughout Philadelphia’s Historic District.

The street art exhibit inspired by last months’ opening of the American Revolutionary Museum, seeks to tie together Philadelphia’s rich historical stories with its vibrant neighborhoods.

Meryl Levitz – CEO of Visit Philly, lead the brief press event, heralding the exhibitions draw; “It’s a great opportunity for our local artists to push the boundaries and make some statements about change. It gives locals and visitors alike another fun, free and interesting way to explore Philadelphia’s Historic District – the original city.”

Revolutionary is funded, in part, by three grants awarded to Visit Philly’s Historic District campaign. The artworks will appear indoors and outdoors at selected 13 innovatory sights and attractions from May 25th throughout Philadelphia’s annual Welcome America Festival cumulating July 4th.

The exhibition was curated by Conrad Benner, the founder and editor of street art photo-blog streetsdept.com.  Benner, a foremost authority on documenting Philadelphia’s street art culture selected thought provoking local artists/activist like Michelle Angela Ortiz, Shawn Theodore, IshKnits, and Calo Rosa to lead the way.  Benner will also moderate an artists’ panel at the National Constitution Center on June 7th, 2017 to further explore the exhibits theme.

The more you know:

On Thursday, May 25th there will be an insta-meet with Philadelphia’s influential photographers.  You can follow along with them as they visit the 13 sites (like, Spruce Street Harbor Park, Franklin Square, Elfreth’s Alley and more), documenting the works of art, using the hashtag #RevolutionaryArt.

Philly can also interact with the exhibit with an Instagram Contest running from May 25th – 29th.  Take a photo of your favorite piece from the exhibition; include the official hastags #VisitPhilly #HistoricPhilly #RevolutionaryArt for your chance to win 1 of 5 copies of a piece by artist, Yasmin.

They Left Their Hearts at Casa Azul: How The Frida Kahlo Emojis Came To Be

The spell of Frida Kahlo is like a beacon, drawing to her work those who see their anguish, heartache, resilience or celebration of life expressed in her paintings.  Under Frida’s hue, they find inspiration enough to keep, share or pledge allegiance to her memory on bags, t-shirts or pilgrimages to Frida’s beloved home, Casa Azul.

This year Snapchat devoted one of their International Women’s Day filters to Frida—just a click adorned you with her trademarks braids, a crown of flowers, and red lips underneath a proper unibrow.

The multi-generational Mexican artist with a devoted fan base is the inspiration behind 160 new emojis – called FridaMoji – available in App stores now.

Museumito — a father and son design team, designed the first Kahlo-inspired emoji last summer.  They run Cantor Fine Art and wanted to engage their Instagram audience in a fun and memorable way.  That’s how their Fine Art Emoji project came to be.  The Frida emoji was getting the most attention and the project snowballed from there.

We spoke to Museumito about the success of the FridaMoji app and what it took to make it happen.  Our candid conversation delves into the process and rabbit hole that led to an obvious crush on all things Frida.

“The art of Frida Kahlo is a ribbon about a bomb” – Andre Breton

 

Don’t mind me, I’m just going to barrage you with questions.

Why Frida Kahlo? How long did it take to bring this project to fruition? Did you experience any hang-ups along the way?

It was a long and winding path. I think it took 8 months in total with lots of hang-ups. The biggest of which was that we really did not want to do this project. Not with Frida. Not with any artist.

Larry, my dad, and I are just two art history nerds who run a fine art gallery without a ton of resources. To make emojis for someone like Frida would and should take tons of energy, and emotion, and research.

Here is a timeline of hang-ups:

We launched the fine art emoji project in July last year and it got all that attention online. The comments, emails, and phone calls just never really stopped for four months. It seemed the like the more we told people no, the more they pushed back and the more people reached out. Last week I had a meeting with someone who found the emojis for the first time last week. I wonder if it will ever stop.  After 3-4 months, and enough attention from the art history community, we decided we would entertain the idea…but we would give up a lot of control to make our lives easier and partner with a Korean company, whose name I will leave out, to distribute the emojis/stickers worldwide.

I created 25 animated Frida stickers for them, they showed them to the head of Kakao Talk, and that homie was smitten and said that this was no longer for worldwide release but exclusive only for Kakao Talk. Even though we had already signed contracts for worldwide release.  Frida is HUGE in Korea. There are like Frida stores and Frida makeup lines….

They also wanted me to cut out a bunch of references to Frida’s work and replace it with “more useable emotions.” Sooooo I was like naw. Our goal was to spread Frida’s message, not make a ton of money for a company.  So, through some legal ugliness, we yanked our images and started looking for a new partner.

When we found out that the people who make Kimoji worked in the same building as our gallery, we reached out. We were just about to dump the project but, they were like ‘no dude this is cool, and worth it’. They thought about taking it on, but like, one of the Kardashians was getting a divorce or something, and they decided it wasn’t for them and their brand. Those guys’ are really nice and smart and helped us a ton.  We were like, ‘Ok we said we would do this. Let’s just make it us. We will probably lose money on developing it, it will take a lot longer – but we have gone this far.’ I designed the apps and hired a freelancer — had a ton of learning along the way. However, it was really rewarding. Now we have the app that we own, and I didn’t have to compromise on any references that we were allowed to use from Frida Kahlo Corp.

In terms of why Frida… Frida painted around 143 paintings, 55 of those are self-portraits. Each of these self-portraits had its own emotion or style that we could reference for the emoji.

So why Frida? Because we are living in Frida Mania and there were already so many images of her iconic face expressing anguish, beauty, betrayal, love, happiness, passion, pain.

Plus people were already using this amazing FridaMoji around the world.
}:)   No joke. Fridamaniacs throw a unibrow on all their emoticons. I love it.

Frida Kahlo Emojis _The Two Fridas

I read that you spent some time in Mexico City studying up on Frida. Now that you have bonded with her self-portraits, what elements were the most important to retain when creating the corresponding emoji?

Ya. WOOF. Have you been to Mexico City? That place is amazing. Everyone is so scared of it. I loved my time there. Never felt unsafe. Ate such amazing food. I cannot wait to go back.

The process was – we researched Frida, read books, studied all of her work, and watched the movies. I spent two weeks in Mexico City visiting Casa Azul and all the museums to see as much of the work in person as possible. It really is amazing seeing the work in person. Then spent six months working with the Frida Kahlo Corporation making hundreds of emojis.

I mean before really diving deep into Frida, I knew she had a unibrow, flower crown, a pet monkey, and parrot was married to Diego and was often sad. I think for a majority of people she is a unibrow and flower and they know they are supposed to like her. When I started reading about her and her work and her life, it is impossible to not get swept up in it. She was such a remarkable figure. She was so honest and so brave. She was so beautiful and so ugly. She was so tortured and yet found bliss. She was so romantic and always heartbroken. She was so secluded and yet so popular. I just fell in love with her character and her message, in a way I never really have with another artist.

I swear you can stand in front of Los Dos Fridas for days and still not take it all in. Then some of her work is so intimate and small. So when I went to Mexico I just gobbled everything up. Just tried to take in the overall messages and jotted down notes about recurring images or themes beyond a third of paintings are self-portraits. This might sound silly but before I went to Mexico I hadn’t grasped how prevalent or important watermelon was to Frida or what the monkey actually stood for.

Then I came back to the states with a head full of ideas, and I took in every image and painting the Foundation had. Each painting has its own emotion or style or story. So I took all of Frida’s paintings and photos, and thought about what people could actually use in conversations, looked at the most used emoji worldwide, and thought about what could open people up to more of Frida’s work. The process wasn’t necessarily easy. We ended up making over 400 emoji, and only 160 made the cut. Things were cut because they didn’t truly reflect Frida or felt like they wouldn’t be a useful emoji.

So now the question will be can we open up Frida’s legacy to more people?
Can we usher Frida and everything she stood for into this very new medium?
Can she become more than just the iconic flower and a unibrow to her new young fans?

If this is a way to do that….then awesome.

Frida Kahlo Emojis

You mentioned the art history community embracing the project. Could you share a few examples of that?

I can’t track it down because it happened so long ago, but LACMA reposted all the emojis on Facebook after the Artnet article came out and it just went gangbusters. It was as if everyone had to qualify their emails to me with “and you can trust me I’m a museum director” or “and this is coming from an art history teacher.” I loved it. Got lots of emails of die hard Frida fans.  Last week I helped a preschool teacher, and we were in someone’s master’s thesis in Europe.

Projects like this are sustaining new ways of educating and engaging a new generation – what artist is next in the emoji line?

Not sure. To do this right takes a lot of time, energy, and brainpower, and maintaining it takes some work. We have definitely been flirting with other artists estates that we admire, and there is definitely interest.  So we will see. Stay tuned to our Instagram, hopefully, there will be some news soon.

The Digital Graffiti Experience

The digital graffiti experience

These days, some street artists are having trouble finding spaces where they can showcase their work. Over in Glen Cove, New York, an edgy urban project was debuted on a historical downtown landmark known as the First City Project house. While this was meant to be an artistic boost to the struggling downtown area, in addition to art intending to provoke feelings of all kinds, the project sent critics into a frenzy. They claimed that they destroyed the house, despite the artists taking care in preserving the wood.

But there’s a new innovation that’s giving street artists a new avenue, an opportunity for freedom of expression with no limitations as to where they can or cannot display their work. Because of the growth in the mobile app sector, creative minds have teamed up with gaming developers to bring street art into a virtual world. Mobile gaming is probably one of the fastest growing categories in the video gaming industry, with companies consistently offering new developments that innovate the whole field at large. These tools have brought us closer to real life experiences in a digital space, as tech giants like Gaming Realms, which is currently running the Slingo franchise, continue to be honored for their interactive mobile content and its ability to merge gameplay with social media. Another example is Google, which is lending its Tilt Brush to other VR platforms like Oculus Rift.

The Tilt Brush may have been one of their most impressive products that has breathed new life into contemporary art, but there are a couple of companies that may be giving Google a run for its money. Epic Games, for one, is employing VR technology to transport artists to different places around the world, letting them tag, spray and add their mark to any walls they wish, whether it is an alleyway, a backstreet or an underpass. Choose between airbrushes, spray cans and stencils to work with, and take advantage of features such as mirror painting to streamline your workflow.

Another spray-painting experience that will be available to the public soon is the Kingspray Graffiti Simulator VR. Although it’s already available in a non-VR format, playable on mobile devices, it worked quite well on the HTC Vive headset. With this app, artists can hone in on their skills without potentially ruining any physical canvases, practicing on realistic surfaces with drips. This format will make its premiere on SteamVR this month.

What do you think about street art in a virtual space?