What?! Geode Wedding Cakes

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We’re totally feeling these amethyst-inspired cake created by Rachel Teufel of Intricate Icings’.  The sweet geodes are made with rock candy accents that make the cakes look pretty bad ass.

Not to mention that seeing it automatically reminded us of the geode work of Los Angeles based artist, A Common Name.

Below are cakes created by Intricate Icings and the sweet desserts that they inspired.
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via Bored Panda

Basquiat’s Great Jones Street Loft To Be Immortalized

57 Great Jones Street, New York. Courtesy of Google Maps.

57 Great Jones Street is more than the former home and studio of artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988).  It represents a mythical era of street art – an infamous downtown cool kids scene most of us never got to experience firsthand.

On July 13, as part of the historic plaque program, the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (GVSHP) will unveil a plaque marking the site of Basquiat’s former home and studio – once owned by his friend and mentor, Andy Warhol.

The historic plaque unveiling ceremony (in partnership with Two Boots) aims to “celebrate and explore the invaluable work and local connections of this essential artist,” GVSHP said.  The event will take place on July 13 at 6 pm, attendance is free but reservations are requested.  The presentation will be followed by free pizza courtesy of local restaurant Two Boots.

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Astro Creates Massive Optical Illusion Mural

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If your stroll down the street suddenly feels like you’re portaling into another dimension, you may have stumbled into one of Astro’s massive illusions.  Parisian graffiti artist Astro creates optical illusion murals that draw viewers into unreachable realms.  His trademark curves and abstract calligraphy shapes recently turned up on a residential building in Loures, Portugal, just south of Lisbon for the urban art project Loures Art Publica.

Check out the sweet pics below.

 

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Astro: Website Instagram

via [MyModernMet]

All images via Astro.

That Time JR Made the Pyramid at the Louvre Disappear

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©JR-ART.NET paysage.jpg

 

French street artist, JR, was invited by the Louvre museum to wrap their world-famous glass pyramid with one of his monumental anamorphic images.

The Louvre has an amazing history —  originally built as a fortress in 1190, it was reconstructed in the 16th century to serve as a royal palace; in 1793, Louis XIV and Marie Antoinette moved out and relocated their entire royal court to Versailles. And now, the Louvre is an art museum, exhibiting the royal collection and artifacts.

It’s equally famous pyramid was designed in 1985 by American architect, I.M.Pei.  The pyramid is a subterranean entrance into the Louvre, restructuring the old design, merging all of the museum’s wings with a common access point.  There’s nothing quite like witnessing the contrast of this contemporary wonder against the museum’s  baroque stateliness as you descend into what will seem like a endless abyss of art (it covers a whopping 652,300 square feet).

There’s was backlash against it’s construction, as art lovers around the world fought against what they were sure would destroy the very heart of Paris. Now this otherworldly 71-foot-high structure of glass and metal sitting in front of the main entrance is one of the most photographed landmarks in Paris.  Recent studies show that the Louvre draws nearly twice the number of visitors than it did before the Pyramid’s installation. That steamrolling commentary of fear that Pei’s design would violate the museum’s historical integrity found new air as the conversation retained relevancy with the course of JR’s Louvre project.

JR talked about the ongoing feud between traditional and modern tastes in art in an interview with curator and journalist, Hugo Vitrani.
“Making the Pyramid disappear is a way for me to distance myself from my subject…My work is about transmitting history to better understand the present, and find echoes with our own times. What happened in the past is part of a broader context that can still have relevance for today. By erasing the Louvre Pyramid, I am highlighting the way Pei made the Louvre relevant for his time, while bringing the Louvre back to its original state. The Pyramid is one of the most photographed French monuments. I am re-directing its energy, because people are going to have to move around it. They are going to look for the best angle to get the full impact of the anamorphic image, and really make the Pyramid disappear.”
It’s been more than 25 years since the pyramid was introduced to the world.  Some say, Pei achieved a kind of architectural sleight-of-hand with so much more there than meets the eye.  I’d say JR has joined those ranks.
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Photo credit: legeekcestchic.eu

Amberella’s Goth Hearts

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Goth Heart by Amberella. Photo - Conrad Benner/Streets Dept

Goth Heart by Amberella. Photo – Conrad Benner/Streets Dept

Amber Lynn (aka Amberella) is a Philadelphia-based mixed media and street artist who sees the world through candy-coated eyes. Most of her work is conceptual and often comments on popular culture, body image, or lady drama.  What we find intriguing is her honest draw on past and present personal life experiences and how she freely she lets it all bleed out into the street.

Her newest series, Goth Hearts is a culmination of feelings pulled from diaries, notes, sketchbooks, scribbles, memories, and every day feels.  It’s raw and vulnerable, seeking to touch on the viewer’s emotions and evoke feeling upon first glance.  Here, there are no candy-colored sappy sentiments packaged and disguised in an array of pretty lies.

“This work speaks to my own experiences and vulnerabilities. I’m revisiting, exploring, and releasing these emotions, whether past or present, back into the universe. The streets serve as a platform to create an unexpected raw reaction for the viewer. The streets are conceptually part of my process and I’m passionate about it enough that I push myself to places that are uncomfortable at times; literally putting my heart into the streets .

Besides the therapeutic nature of the work for myself, I hope that it will trigger emotion in others. In regards to the viewer, that’s all I’m after. The viewers experience is truly dependent on that persons’own thoughts, experience, perception, personality, and a plethora of other factors. I just want to provide a moment in time for people to connect with themselves and their emotions. Feelings, -all types- are so important. It means that you are alive and present.”

Truth.

Visit Amberella on Instagram and check out her past work on Streets Dept.

Amberella at Front Street Walls. Photo by @ronzanetich

Amberella at Front Street Walls. Photo by @ronzanetich

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Photo: Amber Lynn

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Photo: Amber Lynn

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Photo: Amber Lynn

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Photo: Amber Lynn

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Photo: Amber Lynn

Peter Gronquist’s New Show “Refuge” opens at Joseph Gross Gallery

Peter Gronquist "Refuge" exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016.  (Photo by Stephen Smith)
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Peter Gronquist “Refuge” exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

“Serenity now!” (yes, that is a Seinfeld reference) came to mind when I immersed myself in Peter Gronquist’s pastel-colored painting show entitled Refuge at Joseph Gross Gallery (548 West 28th Street). A contrast to his edgy strapped-taxidermy animals that blatantly address gun violence, the paintings in Refuge hold a subtle quietness that act like a call and response to his previous work (with these paintings clearly being the conclusive latter). Using color and texture as his subjects, Gronquist has abandoned representational work to communicate a place of happiness and resolve.

To me, Refuge feels like church. Having a particularly chaotic life in a particularly chaotic city, I was both surprised and relieved to emerge from Gronquist’s exhibition feeling totally at ease.  Although the color-field paintings hold up on their own, together they created a cocoon-like environment for me, a safe place for my mind to relax- and actually day dream. Anyone who has experienced the environment created with a room of Robert Ryman white paintings will understand the freedom felt with experiencing art that lets your mind rest. It is a coveted quality I can’t quite describe, and getting there is extremely difficult. But when successful, this type of art has the ability to allow the viewer to shut off the analytical/busy part of their brain, and instead just give in to the subconscious experiential facet that we equate with day dreaming.

Whatever it is, Gronquist has conquered it with Refuge. I focused on the subtle gradation of one color to the next, the gentle textural interplay of tulle, the thick white frames that seemed to elevate each color field as it floated through my daydream. I left the exhibition without anything to say (shocking for a blabbermouth like me) but feeling satiated, all knowing, more understanding.

While some may not find color field paintings to be a religious experience, those who are willing to let go of their brain clutter for a few minutes can experience the relaxing satisfaction that Gronquist’s beautiful new show inspires.

 

Peter Gronquist "Refuge" exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

Peter Gronquist “Refuge” exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

Peter Gronquist "Refuge" exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

Peter Gronquist “Refuge” exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

Peter Gronquist "Refuge" exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

Peter Gronquist “Refuge” exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

L-R: Haley Wen, Sonia Edwards and Evan Berk attend the Peter Gronquist "Refuge" exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

L-R: Haley Wen, Sonia Edwards and Evan Berk attend the Peter Gronquist “Refuge” exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

Peter Gronquist "Refuge" exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

Peter Gronquist “Refuge” exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

Peter Gronquist "Refuge" exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

Peter Gronquist “Refuge” exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

L-R: Casey Gleghorn, Lori Zimmer and Logan Hicks attend the Peter Gronquist "Refuge" exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

L-R: Casey Gleghorn, Lori Zimmer and Logan Hicks attend the Peter Gronquist “Refuge” exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

L-R: Artist Sebastian Wahl, Joseph gross and Anastasia Wahl attend the Peter Gronquist "Refuge" exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

L-R: Artist Sebastian Wahl, Joseph gross and Anastasia Wahl attend the Peter Gronquist “Refuge” exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

L-R: Sienna Mkuruh and Lucia Gioiello attend the Peter Gronquist "Refuge" exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

L-R: Sienna Mkuruh and Lucia Gioiello attend the Peter Gronquist “Refuge” exhibition opening at Joseph Gross Gallery in New York, NY on June 9, 2016. (Photo by Stephen Smith)

Meet The Animation Studio, Juggling Wolf

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Animation Studios are steadily climbing the ranks of the film industry’s Most Influential Lists, challenging our perception of what innovative storytelling looks like. Memorable movies like Inside Out, ParaNorman and Coraline have made household names out of the most successful of them, Pixar and Laika.

Pixar’s successful touring exhibition, The Science Behind Pixar validates the growing public interest in the science and technology behind the magic and the creatives that bring our favorite animated movies to life.

Cinematic giants were bred somewhere, launched from small beginnings helmed by unknown creatives cloaked by these unassuming cool sounding company names.  So who are the new kids on the block? No pun intended.

I’d like to think I can predict the rise of young collectives churning out work with enough ingenuity to carry them to the main stage.  I’ve followed a local animation company whose handmade aesthetic is always captivating.  So I thought, why don’t I introduce you to them? You know – before they hit the pages of WIRED in a Cinderella-esque article that depresses me into wishing I didn’t miss the Van Gogh Boat.

Meet Juggling Wolf, a team of extraordinarily pioneering creative professionals who specialize in stop-motion.  This Philadelphia-based animation studio is the invention of Marina Gvozdeva (Video Editor), Ian Foster (Cinematographer) and Jason Chen (Color Grading Artist).

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Juggling Wolf: Jason Chen, Marina Gvozdeva, and Ian Foster

Out of their imaginations pool cleverly quirky meets cute videos that attract clients like Anthropologie and Popsicle; companies known for wooing the public with attractive doses of nostalgia and whimsy.

Now, this is where I ‘could’ have inserted a short reworked summary of their website’s ‘About Us’ page –most are planned to be the educational equivalent to a brief snooze in class. To our delight, Juggling Wolf’s is a classic old school dating profile – it reads better than anything we could have stated.  It pretty much speaks to why we’re obsessed with the company in the first place.

Name: Juggling Wolf

My Self Summary: I am an Animation Studio
Location: Philadelphia and New York
What am I doing with my life: Animating
I am really good at: Stop Motion Animation
The first things people usually notice about me: My handmade aesthetic
Favorite Books: The Animator’s Survival Kit
Favorite Movies: Click Here
Favorite Shows: Truly Detectives
Favorite Music: BBC1 Essential Mix
Favorite Food: Pho
The six things I can never do without: Lights, Cameras, Actions, After Effects, DragonFrame, Clients
I spend a lot of time thinking about: What’s for dinner?
On a typical Friday night I am: Animating
The most private thing I am willing to admit: I am not keen on writing bios
I am looking for: Clients who like animators – ages 0 – ∞ for long-term, short-term business relations.

Jim Bachor’s 2016 Pothole Art Installation ‘Pretty Trashed’

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Thanks to another successful Kickstarter campaign, Chicago artist, Jim Bachor has gotten started on his 2016 pothole art campaign.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, Bachor has been delighting art blogs since 2014 when he decided to put a beautiful spin on the excess of damaging potholes left from brutal Chicago winters.

We’ve been impatiently waiting for the next theme to his well-received pothole art installations – the new series is called Pretty Trashed.  This first mosaic dropped is ‘Beer Can’.  It’s located on Montrose, just east of California on the south side of the street. Go see it Chicago – you lucky ducks. The rest of us will just have to live vicariously through Bachor’s Instagram feed.

It’s not our first time covering Bachor’s cute mosaic potholes. You can check out his past mosaic themes here:

POTHOLE ART PROJECT LAUNCHES NEW SERIES – TREATS IN THE STREETS!

CHICAGO ARTIST FILLS POTHOLES WITH AMAZING MOSAICS

 

*photos courtesy of Jim Bachor

Your Art Fair Guide for Armory Week 2016

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It’s Armory Week and that means gaggles of art fairs will be taking place across New York City.  It’s going to be a whirlwind of amazing art from all over the world, informative talks and lots of Art Star Selfies.  We don’t suggest you try to tackle every fair, choose the ones that interest you the most and pace yourself. Fair fatigue is real–trying to see more art than your brain can process at one time will just ruin the whole experience. Trust us on this… Oh, and by all means, wear comfortable shoes.

 

1. Armory Show

The Armory Show is the daddy of all the fairs.  It’s the big Kahuna with over 200 galleries showing on Piers 92 & 94 for four days of incredible art, engaging talks and daring projects. Walking through both piers can be exhausting, take breaks, and check your coat.  The coat line is so long – one would think they were giving out free drinks – but it’s worth the hands-free next few hours.

DON’T MISS: Brooklyn’s Pierogi gallery will show Jonathan Schipper’s Slow Motion Car Crash, a “choreographed collision” timed to occur during the five-day fair.

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Jonathan Schipper, Slow Motion Car Crash. Photo: Courtesy The Armory Show.

March 3–6, 2016
Thursday–Sunday 12:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Pier 94 and Pier 92, 711 12th Avenue between West 55th Street and West 52nd Street
$45 general admission, or $60 with VOLTA admission

 

2. Volta NY

Volta is Armory’s sister fair – one that keeps getting better in terms of curation.  Its’ art boutique feel is a refreshing change from the chaos that will be happening at Pier 92 & 94 with the Armory crowd. By spotlighting artists through primarily solo projects, VOLTA NY refocuses the art fair experience back to its most fundamental point: the artists and their works.

The Volta fair takes place at Pier 90. Photo: David Williams, courtesy Volta.

The Volta fair takes place at Pier 90.
Photo: David Williams, courtesy Volta.

March 2–6, 2016
Wednesday 8:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m.; Thursday through Saturday 12 p.m.–8:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Pier 90, 711 12th Avenue at West 48th Street
$22.96 general admission, or $55.11 with Armory Show admission

 

3. Spring Break Art Show

Spring/Break is one of the Armory Week attractions I try not to miss, it unapologetically has fun with art – blocking out the cynical in favor of its ‘Look at what I did Ma’ art school vibe.  This year, the annual curator-driven art show, chose ⌘COPY⌘PASTE” as its theme.  We’re still sad the fair had to move out of the Old School on Mott Street in Nolita (making way for a depressing condo development), to the Moynihan Station. The new space retains that feeling of being sent off to the races – with a familiar three-floor execution of exhibits – room after room of romping and art browsing. The rooms can be a showdown of hit-or-miss aesthetics, but I continue to enjoy the discovery beyond each door.

Installation by Taezoo Park, curated by Peter Gynd.

Installation by Taezoo Park, curated by Peter Gynd.

March 2–7
Skylight at Moynihan Station, 421 8th Avenue at West 31st Street
Wednesday–Sunday 12:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.; Monday 12:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
$10 general admission for advance tickets, $15 at the door

 

4. Scope

SCOPE NY brings an array of contemporary art down to the Piers. Thank goodness SCOPE is staying close to the Armory Show again – nothing like being able to stroll, and not UBER to the main fair. This year they’re promising a new “open-plan” layout and 60 international exhibitors.

Erik Jones, Joseph Gross Gallery

Erik Jones, Joseph Gross Gallery

March 3–6, 2016
Thursday 6:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m.; Friday–Sunday 11:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.
Metropolitan Pavilion West 60 galleries, 639 W 46th Street
$35 general admission

 

5. Pulse

Last year, PULSE New York was a bit of a snooze fest. This year the fair is back at its normal location,  Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 West 18th Street.   With the focus on a smaller scale – 45 galleries from four continents.  Hopefully this tightly curated content will play out better than last year’s hodge-podge.

Pulse Art Fair NYC Front Entrance

Pulse Art Fair NYC Front Entrance

March 3–6
Thursday 1:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 11:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.; Sunday 11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
The Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 West 18th Street
$25 general admission

 

6. Art on Paper

Art on Paper returns to Manhattan’s Lower East Side in March 2016, building on the success of the fair’s inaugural 2015 edition. It may be further away from the main fair, but it’s well worth the trip to see how artists are transforming paper into extrodinary works of art.  We’re especially looking forward to the lineup from first-time exhibitors Paradigm Gallery + Studio, representing Philadelphia, PA.

Courtesy of Art on Paper

Courtesy of Art on Paper

March 3–6
Thursday 6:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m.; Friday–Saturday, 11:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
Pier 36, 299 South Street on the East River
$25 general admission

 

7. ADAA Art Show

28th edition, of the Art Dealers Association of America’s annual fair, is back at that glorious Park Avenue Armory space.  With 72 exhibitors of fine art.  Newcomers include Hauser & Wirth, presenting works by the Modernist Italian sculptor, installation artist, and poet Fausto Melotti, and Tilton Gallery, showing new sculptures by Chicago-born artist Simone Leigh, whose work explores female African-American subjectivity.

Courtesy of the ADAA

Courtesy of the ADAA

March 2–6
Wednesday–Friday 12:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.; Saturday 12:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.
Park Avenue Armory, Park Avenue at East 67th Street
$25 general admission

 

8. Independent

Dont’ go looking for the Independent in Chelsea, the fair has taken up residence in Tribeca’s Spring Studios.  The popular fair’s niche market is international galleries and non-profit institutions.

March 3–6, 2016
Thursday 6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 12:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 p.m.–6:00p.m.
Spring Street Studios, 50 Varick Street
$25 general admission/$15 for students

 

9. Clio Art Fair

CLIO ART FAIR is a curated fair created with the idea of discovering independent artists and showcasing the careers and achievements of already affirmed creative minds. Labeled the “anti-fair for independent artists,” Clio provides a showcase for artists without gallery representation, selected for inclusion in the fair by a panel of judges.
March 3–6
Thursday 6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m., Friday and Saturday 10:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
508–526 West 26th St.
Free

10. New City Art Fair

This small contemporary Asian art fair, which focuses on emerging artists, is now in its fifth year.

March 3–6
Thursday 11:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 11:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.; Sunday 12:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
hpgrp Gallery New York, 434 Greenwich Street
Free

Insomnia: Drew Mcleod — Flux

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A video posted by David McLeod (@david_mcleod) on

3D artist David McLeod plays with motion — trippy art experiments that explore flocking behavior. Mesmerizing is how I’ll describe the state of these objects in flux crashing over his website. Slow movements that crash into and pull away from each other in a seductive play that gives me further proof of my attraction to art.

That is all. Press play on the Instagram posts…I want you to fall into this rabbit hole with me.

David McLeod
Website / Instagram / Facebook

A photo posted by David McLeod (@david_mcleod) on

E is for Eckman-Lawn — Alex Eckman-Lawn

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This is Alex Eckman-Lawn’s bio… “Alex Eckman-Lawn is a Philadelphia born illustrator who lives in the gutter and sleeps in the sewer. His work has appeared in comic books, on album covers, book covers, T-shirts, music videos, and posters. He is currently hard at work trying to burn his name into the ground and pull the sun out of the sky.”

Yup, he is that freaking cool.

No matter what medium he’s working with, it’s trademarked with complicated dark overtures layered in emotion. Our personal favorite — his contemporary framed cut paper collage pieces, each layer stacked upon another create a dense narrative that unveils a story slowly being released to the viewer.

At first glance, the narratives of his work seems peppered with themes of loneliness and fear — but the graceful shafts of light and placement of color betray a sense of hope and redemption.  It’s not hard to see the painstaking care and finesse layered in his pieces – so exacting in trying to maintain a compulsive control over chaotic worlds.

Check out the video below to see Eckman-Lawn discuss his process.

Alex Eckman-Lawn on Social Media
Website/Instagram / Tumblr

Alex’s work appears in the following comics:
Awakening Volumes 1 and 2, Popgun volume 4 (Rusted: Faded Signal), Mouse Guard: Legends of the Guard (Leviathan), The Graphic Canon Vol.1 (Forgive Us Our Trespasses), and Little Nemo: Dream Another Dream. He is working on an all-ages adventure book called Thanatos Diver right now.

Photo Essay – The Ghosts of Coney Island

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by Leighkaren Labay

I was wondering if I would have any trouble finding a parking spot due to all the snow, but the minute I turned onto Ocean Avenue, I saw it would be easy. The street showed no signs of life. I pulled my car up in front of Nathan’s and went in. I needed a hot dog for sustenance. Even though the streets were empty and covered in snow, I was happy to be at Coney Island. This was the place my family had been going to as a summer hotspot for three generations. It was a part of my heritage. And it was totally deserted on this cold, winter’s day.

To me, one of the saddest things is an amusement park in the winter time. There is a particular brand of melancholy that I associate with it. It’s like ghosts are all around, the gloomy ghosts left behind when summer went away and all the people went home. Lonely, but sadly beautiful.

The pictures that this essay accompanies were taken on one of the coldest days of last winter. There were, surprisingly, many more people walking on the boardwalk and on the beach than I thought. Leave it to New York: people in the most unlikely of places at the most unlikely of times. No surprise there.

I walked on the deserted boardwalk; past the tattoo parlors, the Nathan’s, Astroland, and the Wonder Wheel. Walking on the beach was lovely, and I sat on the deserted benches and watched the cold Atlantic wax and wane. I thought about the brave swimmers of the Polar Bear Club. This was their kind of day.

The sun was beginning to go down, and the shadows on the fairway were lengthening. I don’t think I would want to be here in full darkness. Those ghosts that I felt barely touching me earlier would be out in full force soon enough, sadly waiting in their melancholy way for the fun to begin again, and for the people to come back.

Now go see: Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861–2008 at the Brooklyn Museum thru March 13, 2016.  “Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861–2008 is the first major exhibition to explore the kaleidoscopic visual record they created, documenting the historic destination’s beginnings as a watering hole for the wealthy, its transformation into a popular beach resort and amusement mecca, its decades of urban decline culminating in the closing of Astroland, and its recent revival as a vibrant and growing community.”

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