SET IN THE STREET: The Ultimate Selfie Zone

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Set in the Street is an ongoing art project started by Photographer, Justin Bettman.  Bettman, a 23-year-old California native was looking for a way to save money on studio space. He and his collaborator Gözde Eker, starting kicking around ideas until they decided “Why don’t we try to shoot these outside?”

Their work questions our perspective — a trick of the eye. At first glance, on close inspection the scene played out before you seems normal. But when you’re pulled back and you see the entire picture, that’s when you realize you only had half a story.

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The sets they use for the shoots are foraged from unwanted furniture and materials, most of which they find on the street. After shooting the initial photos, the sets are left up on the street with a sign that invites folks to shoot their own photos and post them using the hashtag #setinthestreet.

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set in the street

photos via Justin Bettman/Setinthestreet.com

MEET US IN NYC FOR FRIEZE WEEK!

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Frieze-New-York-2014-

Months that begin with ‘M’ mean art overload here at HAHA. We barely recovered from Armory Week and yet here we go again. By no means is that a complaint—trust me—I am typing this with glee. The feeling of being thrown into the hustle and bustle of a week filled with activities centered solely around art is tantamount to the endorphin rush I get on my diet cheat day. While I gather together my art fair survival kit and book my ticket to New York; why don’t you peruse the fair offerings Frieze week has to offer. Our social media blasts from the fairs starts today. Make sure you’re following us on

Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram this week for pics from the fairs.

 

FRIEZE Art Fair

When: May 14–17 / Thursday–Saturday: 11am–7pm; Sunday: 11am–6pm ($44)
Where: Randall’s Island Park (Randall’s Island)

Frieze is one of the world’s biggest contemporary art fairs. Art lovers/art curious make the pilgrimage across the East River to Randall Island Park to scope out which way the contemporary art trends are swaying. Over 190 galleries are participating at Frieze New York 2015—this year the focus is on local galleries. This is a mammoth of a fair — do yourself a favor and download their handy floor plan.

Not to be missed: Talks between Studio Museum in Harlem director Thelma Golden and Brooklyn Museum director Arnold Lehman (May 15, 4pm), as they attempt to answer the question: “Whom do museums serve?”

SELECT Art Fair

When: May 14–17 / Thursday, Friday: 2–10pm; Saturday: 12–10pm; Sunday: 12–6pm ($20)
Where: Center 548 (548 West 22nd Street, Chelsea, Manhattan)

SELECT Art Fair is the avant-garde friend of FRIEZE. The fair provides a contemporary platform for galleries to market emerging to mid-career artists. This year SELECT is fueled by more interactive art programming including an exciting roster of installations, musical talent, performances, book signings and lectures. I’m looking forward to the rooftop performance piece, You Are Here, where a multi-sensory installation and living sculpture will be activated by performers, musicians, dancers, and visitors.

Art Miami New York

When: May 14–17 / Thursday: 5–9pm; Friday, Saturday: 12–8pm; Sunday: 12–6pm ($25)
Where: Pier 94 (55th Street and West Side Highway, Hell’s Kitchen, Manhattan)

… As the name suggests, there are two incarnations of Art Miami New York.  Their Frieze Week debut will showcase a number of events, art talks, tours and nearly 1200 emerging and established artists from over 50 countries and 100 leading international art galleries. Art Miami produces other art fairs, such as CONTEXT, Aqua, Art Wynwood, CONTEXT New York, Art Southampton and Art Silicon Valley / San Francisco. No matter what the location (Miami is my fave),  Art Miami New York is one of the most important art events in the city.

NADA Art Fair

When: May 14–17 / Thursday: 6–8pm; Friday, Saturday: 11am–7pm; Sunday: 11–5pm (free)
Where: Pier 36 (299 South Street, Lower East Side, Manhattan)

NADA is the second largest fair during the week.  The 2015 lineup will include 100 galleries, including 27 first-time exhibitors. Apart from the regular program, NADA in New York 2015 will also have a series of performances, conversations and events.  Different events will be held each day of the fair. I’m looking forward to: Thursday’s program entitled NADA x PAOM NADA x PAOM, with an artist-designed, limited edition line of clothing and objects featuring artwork by three contemporary artists, each represented by NADA galleries. Sunday, Aeromoto and Wendy’s Subway will present A+WS, a collaboratively curated library and reading room designed by Tyler Polich and Hannah Wilentz , with a focus on art books, periodicals and exhibition catalogues by Latin American publishers.

1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair

When: May 15–17 / Friday, Saturday: 12–8pm; Sunday: 12–6pm ($10)
Where: Pioneer Works (159 Pioneer Street, Red Hook, Brooklyn)

… London’s 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair is making its debut during Frieze Week. 1:54 is a reference to fifty-four countries that constitute the African continent, the title of 1:54 establishes the parameters of the fair’s ethos: as a platform that strives to represent multiplicity and showcase the diversity of contemporary African art and cultural production on an international stage. 1:54 NY’s participating galleries, which come from Abidjan, Cape Town, Johannesburg, Lagos, London, Marrakech, Milan and Paris, will feature works from 70+ African artists, including Gabonese painter Boris Nzebo, British-Nigerian draftswoman Ruby Onyinyechi Amanze, legendary Malian portrait photographers Malick Sidibé and Seydou Keita, Senegalese fashion and fine arts photographer Omar Victor Diop, Kenyan visual artist Jim Chuchu, Beninese mixed-media artist Romuald Hazoumè, iconic Nigerian photographer J.D. Okhai Ojeikere, Mozambican sculptor Gonçalo Mabunda, Belgian-Beninese photographer Fabrice Monteiro, and Tunisian artist and researcher Nidhal Chamekh, among others.

Not to be missed: artists talk with Hank Willis Thomas and Lyle Ashton Harris on the importance of the term “diaspora” to their practices (May 15, 4:15pm).

Artists Turn Raw Foods Into Works of Art

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When Dutch artists Lernert and Sander were commissioned to shoot photographs for a food themed documentary, they brilliantly transformed 98 different raw foods into perfect cubes. Each cube is a perfect 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 cm cube, spaced evenly across their grid — intense in color and texture.

Prints from the project, CUBES can be found here.

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Food Art1

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Photography: Lernert & Sander
via Lernert & Sander Website

Colorful Shredded Paper Installations

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Accumulation 2013 Shredded Paper Variable Installation at Moberg Gallery

Artist Travis Rice’s colorful installations are made up of thousands of strips of shredded paper layered in organized chaos. The ceiling to floor installations take on whimsical vibes – the room often looking more like a set for a Seuss inspired photo shoot.

His work creates a sense of stillness in movement; the frozen motion of undulating waves and cascading waterfalls that start feeling like living organisms stun you with blasts of brilliant colors.

“The approach is similar to that of the impressionist painter, but the brush stroke has been replaced by individual thin strips of paper that are the resultant product of a mechanical shredder,” he says. “The constructed forms are meant to imply frozen motion often starting from the ceiling and cascading to the floor.

My installations explore marks as modules that accumulate to create ordered masses. The approach is similar to that of the impressionist painter but the brush stroke has been replaced by individual thin strips of paper that are the resultant product of a mechanical shredder.

My palette is at one moment subjective and in another moment a basic application of color theory, but always gaudy and corrupt. Color allows me the opportunity to interject my cynical sense of humor and infatuation with early Disney cartoons. Ultimately, I see the work as a celebration of composition’s most fundamental element represented in an optimistic, mischievous manner while at the same time maintaining an aspiration toward intellectual purpose.”

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Cotton Candy Cesspool 2013 Shredded Paper Variable Pearson Lakes Art Center Okoboji, IA

 

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Rainbow Dyed Psychedelic Hallucination 2012 Shredded Paper Variable Artstop 2012 Des Moines, IA

Rainbow Dyed Psychedelic Hallucination
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Shredded Paper
Variable
Artstop 2012 Des Moines, IA

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Consumable Fragments 2007 Shredded Paper, Galvanized Metal, Pastel and Graphite Drawings Variable Fitch Gallery Des Moines, IA

 

 

Contamination 2013 Mixed Media Variable Moberg Gallery

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Moberg Gallery

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Multiple Universes 2006 Shredded Paper, Stainless Steel Gazing Balls, Pastel on Paper Drawings Variable

 

Pothole Art Project Launches New Series – Treats in the Streets!

Creamsicle (Glass & Marble Mosaic)

Winter left the streets in my city riddled with potholes – wrecking havoc on my car, leaving me feeling like I’m one bump away from leaving an axle in the road. It also reminded me to check in with Jim Bachor, the artist from Chicago who fills potholes with amazing glass & marble mosaics.

Last year we covered the public art project and watched as nine mosaics were installed around Chicago. After a successful Kickstarter campaign, Bachor’s 2015 Pothole Art Installation Project launched a new series of pothole art installations called Treats in the Streets. A perfect name for the creamy white tiles bordering brightly colored popsicles seemingly tossed off a Good Humor truck.

Take a sweet look at the first pieces from the series to hit the streets.

 

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Bomp Pop

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Creamsicle (Glass & Marble Mosaic)

Creamsicle (Glass & Marble Mosaic)

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Twin Lime Popsicles

 

 

PS. Bachor is on his way to Finland to drop six more of pieces during their End of Winter Festival. Follow his Instagram account to see the updates.

Photos taken by Jim Bachor.

 

ART IN THE WILD – PHILLY MUSEUM OF ART TAKES THE MASTERS OUTSIDE

Still Life with a Ham and a Roemer

Willem Claesz. Heda, Dutch (active Haarlem), 1594 - 1680/82
Still Life with a Ham and a Roemer Willem Claesz. Heda, Dutch (active Haarlem), 1594 - 1680/82

Still Life with a Ham and a Roemer
Willem Claesz. Heda, Dutch (active Haarlem), 1594 – 1680/82

Philadelphia Museum of Art is branching out with a major art initiative, extending its arts outreach into ten local communities. This summer residents of participating communities throughout the city and region will find themselves stumbling across high-quality reproductions of famous works of art from the Museum’s vast collection in unexpected places.

The “Inside Out” initiative, funded by a $340,000 grant from the Knight Foundation, was conceived by the Detroit Institute of the Arts as a way to engage the community in its collection, and has been in hundreds of locations over the past five years.

Each neighborhood will host up to twelve masterpieces within a short distance of each other, displayed in a frame representative of the time period in which it was created. The art will be accompanied by a label with commentary by members of the Museum’s staff explaining what they most admire about the works.

The project will unfold in two phases—the summer installation begins in May 1st in the Philadelphia neighborhoods of East Passyunk and Chestnut Hill and Mt. Airy; in Haddonfield, New Jersey; Media, Pennsylvania and Newtown, Pennsylvania. Inside Out will continue with installations this fall beginning in late August in Fishtown and Kensington in Philadelphia and in the Pennsylvania communities of Ambler, Norristown, Wayne and West Chester.

Communities participating in the project will receive free admission to the museum at designated times during the installation.

Find your local locations now, and get ready to experience some of the finest masterpieces in the open air.

Works on view

Media (Delaware County, PA)
Mary Cassatt, Mother and Child (1908)
Marc Chagall, Half-Past Three (The Poet) (1911)
Juan Gris, Man in a Café (1912)
Vasily Kandinsky, Little Painting with Yellow (Improvisation) (1914)
Paul Klee, Fish Magic (1925)
Claude Monet, The Japanese Footbridge and the Water Lily Pool, Giverny (1899)
Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon of the Colorado River (1892 and 1908)
Pablo Picasso, Self-Portrait with Palette (1906)
Henri Rousseau, Carnival Evening (1886)
Henry Ossawa Tanner, The Annunciation (1898)
Unknown (made in Korea), Lotus (19th century; Joseon Dynasty, 1392–1910)
Unknown (made in India; attributed to Nihal Chand), Krishna and Radha (about 1750)

Haddonfield (Camden County, NJ)
Constantin Brancusi, The Kiss (1916)
Paul Cézanne, Mont Sainte-Victoire, 1902–4
Frederic Edwin Church, Pichincha (1867)
Simon Jacobsz. de Vlieger, Marine (about 1652–53)
Daniel Garber, Tanis (1915)
Jacob Lawrence, The Libraries Are Appreciated (1943)
Sir Frederic Leighton, Portrait of a Roman Lady (La Nanna) (1859)
Joan Miró, Dog Barking at the Moon (1926)
Claude Monet, Poplars on the Bank of the Epte River (1891)
Georgia O’Keeffe, Two Calla Lilies on Pink (1928)
Unknown (made in France), Rondel Depicting Holofernes’s Army Crossing the Euphrates River (1246–48)

Newtown (Bucks County, PA)
Marcel Duchamp, Nude Descending a Staircase (No. 2) (1912)
Edward Hicks, Noah’s Ark (1846)
Winslow Homer, The Life Line (1884)
Jean-Antoine Houdon, Bust of Benjamin Franklin (1706–1790) (1779)
Édouard Manet, Le Bon Bock (1873)
Charles Willson Peale, Portrait of Yarrow Mamout (Muhammad Yaro) (1819)
Sir Joshua Reynolds, Portrait of Master Bunbury (1780–81)
Sarah Mary Taylor, “Hands” Quilt (Winter 1980)
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, At the Moulin Rouge: The Dance (1890)
Joseph Mallord William Turner, The Burning of the Houses of Lords and Commons, October 16, 1834 (1834–35)

East Passyunk (South Philadelphia)
Canaletto, The Bucintoro at the Molo on Ascension Day (about 1745)
Eduard Charlemont, The Moorish Chief (1878)
Paul Gauguin, The Sacred Mountain (Parahi Te Marae) (1892)
Marsden Hartley, Painting No. 4 (A Black Horse) (1915)
Willem Claesz. Heda, Still Life with a Ham and a Roemer (about 1631–34)
Claude Monet, Manne-Porte, Étretat (1885)
Rubens Peale, From Nature in the Garden (1856)
Robert Rauschenberg, Estate (1963)
Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Girl in a Red Ruff (about 1896)
William Trost Richards, Newport Coast (1902)
Diego Rivera, Sugar Cane (1931)

Chestnut Hill & Mt. Airy (Northwest Philadelphia)
Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, A Reading from Homer (1885)
Moe Brooker, Present Futures (2006)
John Constable, Sketch for “A Boat Passing a Lock” (1822–24)
Beauford Delaney, Portrait of James Baldwin (1945)
Thomas Eakins, Sailboats Racing on the Delaware (1874)
Daniel Garber, Quarry, Evening (1913)
Kano Hōgai, Two Dragons [in Clouds] (1885)
František Kupka, Disks of Newton (Study for “Fugure in Two Colors”) (1912)
Joan Miró, Horse, Pipe, and Red Flower (1920)
Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Portrait of Mademoiselle Legrand (1875)
Rebecca Scattergood Savery, Sunburst Quilt (1839
Unknown (made in Central Tibet), Four Hevajra Mandalas of the Vajravali Cycle (early 15th century)
Vincent van Gogh, Sunflowers (1888 or 1889)
Andy Warhol, Jackie (Four Jackies) (Portraits of Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy) (1964)
Grant Wood, Plowing (1936)
Andrew Newell Wyeth, Groundhog Day (1959)

Chase Me: The entirely 3D printed animated short

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ChaseMe

From the characters to the set, all elements from Filmmaker Gilles-Alexandre Deschaud’s Animated film, Chase Me were printed using a 3d printer. Deschaud spent two years 3D printing 2,500 parts using the Formlabs’ Form 1+ SLA 3D Printer.

Chase Me combines the magic of film with the wonder of 3D printing, every detail forming a beautiful representation of a magical world. This short film follows a ukelele-playing girl who is chased through a dark forest by the monster that emerges from her own shadow.

This creative stop animation project first began as a CG-animated storyboard, which was then 3D printed — frame by frame. Each second of the film is made up of 15 frames. 3D printing brings to animation, especially stop-motion, the freedom to edit on the computer, before committing to the time intensive process of frame by frame animation.

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Check out this video preview of Chase Me:

via Mold3d

Streets Dept Presents The Evolution of Street Art

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Streets Dept 44_cb_15_flyer_rd1_large

 

Yeah, so this is going down…

Streets Dept Presents: The Evolution of Street Art 
An Artists Panel Discussion at The Philadelphia Museum of Art

Wednesday, May 27th, 2015
6:00 – 7:00pm
(Pay what you wish)

This hour-long panel discussion will pick the brilliant minds of some of today’s most active and exciting artists and talk to them about how they use public space (both legally and otherwise) to create dialogue, display their work, and enliven the streets of Philadelphia.

Panel to include Gaia, Joe Boruchow, Ishknits, Harlequinade, and Kid Hazo

pic via StreetDept

Per Kristian Nygård Fills A Gallery With Rolling Green Hills

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Norway-based artist Per Kristian Nygård fills a gallery with rolling green hills, or rather, filled the exhibition space of NoPlace Gallery in Oslo with the exploration of capabilities and the limitations of the spatial.  The green hilly landscapes, Not Red But Green (2014), were supported by wooden constructions and grown from seeds that had been planted weeks earlier during the summer in the damp gallery rooms, creating optimal growing conditions for the sculpture.

Nygård says the work was “seemingly meaningless and confusing – as a contrast to the all-encompassing meaningful and personalised we surround ourselves with”.

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via artist website

Photos: Jason Olav Benjamin Havneraas.

 

Crochet Artist OLEK Wraps Homeless Shelter in India

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Here are the final images from crochet artist OLEK‘s time in New Delhi working on a massive project for the ongoing St+art Delhi Street Art Festival. Within the first few days of her arrival in India, Olek held workshops on crochet techniques with volunteers and women from several different organizations.

Olek, whose work often examines sexuality, feminist ideas and the evolution of communication is collaborated with a number of other volunteers to crochet thousands of meters of yarn and fabric at a workshop in South Extension.

This project aimed to bring attention to the temporary night shelters “Raine Basera” which have been set up throughout the city. The one-of-a-kind installation is 40ft long and 8 foot high – in the Sarai Kale Khan area of New Delhi.

Thanks to St+art Delhi, we can give you a peek at the making of her final piece.

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OLEK explores issues of women’s empowerment in INDIA

Olek Image_Photo Credit Pranav Mehta

Olek Image_Photo Credit Pranav Mehta

Crochet artist OLEK is in New Delhi working on a massive project for the ongoing St+art Delhi Street Art Festival. Within the first few days of her arrival in India, Olek held workshops on crochet techniques with volunteers and women from several different organizations.

Olek, whose work often examines sexuality, feminist ideas and the evolution of communication is collaborating with a number of other women who have volunteered. Together they are crocheting thousands of meters of yarn and fabric at a workshop in South Extension.

Since then, the women have been given several meters of fabric, which they take back home with them and crochet into hearts and butterflies and other forms, which will all, be used to make a larger artwork for the project. This project aims to bring attention to the temporary night shelters “Raine Basera” which have been setup throughout the city; it also explores the issues of women empowerment. The women workers involved range from housewives, working professionals to students – across a diverse socio-economic background.

“The government has taken a great initiative by setting up homeless shelters all across the city, but a majority of people are unaware of their existence. Olek is an iconic name in the global street art community and her projects are always vibrant and work around empowering women. Through this project we aim to draw the attention of the whole city towards this positive initiative, while working with women from different walks of life to bring this project to life,” says Akshat Nauriyal, Content Director, St+art Delhi.

OLEK will install this one-of-a-kind project on the family night shelter – about 40 ft long and 8 foot high – in the Sarai Kale Khan area of New Delhi on March 17th.

Thanks to St+art Delhi, we can give you a peek at the making of her final piece.

 

Olek Profile (2)_ Photo Credit Pranav Mehta

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Olek_Workshop_India(2)

Follow St+art Foundation at:

Instagram: Instagram.com/startindia

Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/startindiafoundation

The Candy Lab

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Depriving an artist of credit for their work is not what I’m in the habit of doing. Frankly, that is not what I’m trying to do now. But for the love of God, please don’t tell me your little Middle School heart isn’t racing right now. Because you, much like I, momentarily thought that Lisa Frank has reinvented herself as a contemporary artist. Or at the least, that your middle school locker was touched by a magic wand that made the LF world melt off your notebooks, Trapper Keepers and pencils, spilling out onto the floor.

Will the truth hurt you now? Will you be sad to know Lisa Frank is not the artist? Do you need a second before I disclose that the artists go by the name of Pip & Pop? It is still a pretty cute, cough up rainbows name.

Pip & Pop, is a collaboration between Australian artists Tanya Schultz & Nicole Andrijevic.  We did find out that Andrijevic left to follow a different direction while Tanya continues to create elaborate installations and works, sometimes individually and sometimes with other artists and friends.

The intricate patterned floor installations are made with a dreamy combination of colorful candy, glitter, sand, toys, beads, and other bright objects. The only thing left to ask is ‘Where are the Unicorns?’

Enjoy these pictures from their latest exhibit, The Candy Lab.

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via MyModernMet