Another Year, Another Armory Show Survival Guide

Here it comes, a marathon week, when the Armory Show and other art fair exhibitions descend upon New York City–some people love it, to others it is a professional duty and a physical endurance test, to be survived as best as possible.

As a freelancer, over the years, The Armory Show has turned into quite an event for me. The Armory Show is New York’s premier art fair (it welcomes over 65,000 visitors annually) and a definitive cultural destination for discovering and collecting the world’s most important 20th and 21st century artworks. Staged on Piers 92 & 94, the fair features presentations by leading international galleries, innovative artist commissions and dynamic public programs. This time of year, it is also freezing cold and windy on the piers; most years, I just pray for decent weather & endurance.

While attending the Armory Show is a great time, it also an event to mentally prepare yourself for. Here is my list of Armory Must Do’s – it will help you get the most out of your day of art overload.

  • Have a decent breakfast before you head out to the shows…don’t get me wrong, this is an amazing time of the year, but it’s long and you need to know it’s not the type of thing you do for an hour and then move on. Which brings me to my next rule…
  • Wear comfortable shoes. I know you see people fashionably arriving to the show and there is nothing wrong with looking good, but trust me, if their heels are over 3 inches, they are not serious. Chances are you are planning to visit other art fairs during the day – New York is an asphalt jungle and nothing will take you down faster than trying to traverse the art fairs in cute heels.
  • Know when to break for a meal; lack of food will cause you to forget just about anything, even if it is great. Personally, I keep granola bars and fresh pressed juice in my bag for quick power snacks.
  • Have patience. The crowds can be overwhelming. The Armory Show takes place across 250,000 square feet of exhibition space. Just remember that everyone wants to see everything – a near impossible feat. Friday is less crowded than Saturday; Sunday is a tossup. The contemporary side (Pier 94) is always the hot ticket, so expect some shoving and long lines for the coatroom.
  • Over the years, my appreciation for art has truly grown. You may not understand it or get what the artist is trying to convey, but you can still appreciate it, and in the end that’s all that matters, because art is not about understanding, but more of a feeling.
  • Most of all, know when to call it quits. If it all starts to blend, you have probably had enough for the day. Save some for tomorrow or even next year – shut it down – go have dinner & drinks and pat yourself you the back and call it a wrap. You survived.

Another Year, Another Armory Show Survival Guide

Location

Piers 92 & 94
711 12th Avenue, New York, 10019

Hours

Thursday, March 2: 12–8pm
Friday, March 3: 12–8pm
Saturday, March 4: 12–7pm
Sunday, March 5: 12–6pm

Arcade Classics: Video Games from the Collection of Museum of the Moving Image

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All you need to know is laid in the museum’s press release below.  I’ll just add our ringing endorsement – the pleasure of being in several dark rooms with just the glow of screens to guide your way.  Whether you were reliving your childhood or showing your kids what it really means to have your name on the leaderboard – this exhibit was a field trip to drool over.

“Arcade Classics features more than 30 video arcade games released between 1971 and 1993, drawn from the Museum’s collection. All of the games will be playable. Though the era of the video arcade game is long gone, arcade games were the grounds for innovation and experimentation that informed the genres, conventions, and play mechanics of the video games that we know today.

The earliest game on view in Arcade Classics is Computer Space (1971), the first coin-operated video arcade game, created by Nolan Bushnell. While Computer Space was not a commercial success, Bushnell used the $500 he earned from it to found Atari. After seeing an early demonstration of a ball and paddle game for the soon-to-be-released Magnavox Odyssey (1972), he along with Allan Acorn developed Pong (1972), also on view, which became a massive commercial and cultural phenomenon, and spawned a new industry. The 38 games on view in the exhibition range in genre from early sports games (Atari Football, NBA Jam, Track & Field); fighting games (Karate Champ, Mortal Kombat); driving games (Pole Position, Out Run); puzzle and platformers (Donkey Kong, Frogger, Q*Bert); and a diverse array of “shooters,” many set in space (Asteroids,Galaxian, Defender, Space Invaders, Zaxxon), but also earthbound variations like Centipede.

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A complete list of games on view:  Arkanoid (Taito. Released in the U.S. by Romstar, 1986),  Asteroids (Atari, 1979), Atari Football (Atari, 1979), Battlezone (Atari, 1980), Berzerk (Stern, 1980), Centipede (Atari, 1981), Computer Space (Nutting, 1971), Crazy Climber (Nihon Busan / Distributed in North America by Taito, 1980), Defender (Williams, 1980), Dig Dug (Atari, 1982), Donkey Kong (Nintendo, 1981), Dragon’s Lair (Cinematronics, 1983), Frogger (Sega, 1981), Galaxian (Namco / Manufactured in the U.S. by Bally/Midway, 1979), Galaxy Force II (Sega, 1988), Gauntlet (Atari, 1986), Karate Champ (Data East, 1985), Missile Command (Atari, 1979), Mortal Kombat (Midway, 1992), Ms. Pac-Man (Namco / Manufactured in the U.S. by Bally/Midway, 1982), NARC (Williams, 1988), NBA Jam (Midway, 1993), Out Run (Sega, 1986), Pole Position (Atari, 1983), Pong (Atari, 1972), Q*Bert (Gottlieb, 1982), Qix (Taito, 1981), Robotron 2084 (Williams, 1982), Space Invaders (Taito, 1979), Star Wars (Atari, 1983), Super Breakout (Atari, 1978), 10 Yard Fight (Taito, 1984), Tempest (Atari, 1981), Terminator 2: Judgment Day (Midway, 1991), Time Pilot (Centuri, 1984), Track & Field (Konami/Centuri, 1983), Tron (Bally/Midway, 1982), Zaxxon (Sega / Released in the U.S. by Gremlin, 1982).”

via Museum of the Moving Image

STAR TREK SWIMSUITS ?!

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I want you to go crazy over these.  At least until I knock your excitement down a peg and tell you that unfortunately, these suits are still in the concept stage.  Rileah Vanderbilt (@rileahvanderbilt) posted these to her Instagram awhile ago.  Seems it’s a collaboration between Rileah (geek, gamer, and unicorn) and cosplay maven, Milynn Sarley.

I think we should keep posting these pictures and blogging about these to persuade her to hurry up and let us strut on the beach in these sexy Starfleet suits.

Ladies, I’m ready to get in Formation.

*pic by Susieq

Kid Hazo Plays Up The Pope Visit with some Pope-tacular Signs

Well, kiddies the Pope is here in Philly, so why wouldn’t Kid Hazo hit up the streets with some Pope-tacular signs.

Our favorite has to be the sign collaboration ‘Prohibited Items’ with Mikey Ilagan (Geekadelphia) and Adam J. Teterus, parodying the crazy list prohibited items Philly dropped at the Pope security checkpoints.

Please can I see a group of people out there breaking the rules doing the ‘Stanky Leg’

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PARISIAN STREET ARTIST LEVALET STRIKES AGAIN…

That headline could be a bit confusing.  Levalet, never stopped pasting up, we just picked up some pretty cool shots of his newer pieces.  This year he had a successful solo show and several commissioned installations.  But nothing beats his public works as he continues to delight passersby’s with his playful pieces.

Flashback to some of his earlier work here.

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Cake Sculpture Artists Recreate An Art Masterpiece With Chocolate [Video]

Cake Vermeer Creation

Talk about a more tangible way to ingest art.  With so many artistic interpretations of Vermeer’s “Girl With a Pearl Earring” floating out there on the web, it’s hard to impress.  But check out what cake sculpture artists Cory Polman and Olivia Bohnhoff created for an art-history-buff client in their LA-based shop Bohnhoff & Kent.

The painting served as inspiration for their signature chocolate sculpture filled with ‘cake’ which they deliciously refer to as a “gourmet stuffed candy bar”.  Watch the video and amaze yourself with the beautiful translucent layers of color they’re able to paint onto the sculpture.  The big reveal will make you wonder if you could bring yourself to eat such a masterpiece.

 

via That’s Nerdalicious

photo via Mode Foodie

#TBT Brooklyn Museum – Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe [VIDEO]

It went down this spring at the Brooklyn Museum – Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe.

Killer Heels explored fashion’s most provocative accessory. Along with the showcase of heels from the high platform chopines of sixteenth-century Italy to the glamorous stilettos on today’s runways and red carpets; the exhibition also delved into the imaginative. Showcasing shoes created by new 3D technology and inviting contemporary artists to take looks at the high-heeled shoe’s rich and varied history through film added another layer to the already provocative show.

We think it’s a shame that we only shared these videos on our Vine, so we hope you enjoy this look back on one of our favorite shows of 2015 so far.

Rashaad Newsome / Knot

Leanie van der Vyver / Scary Beautiful, 2012

Steven Klein / untitled, 791, 2014

‘Intersections’ with Joe Boruchow & Kid Hazo @ Paradigm Gallery

Checking out Joe Boruchow at Intersections.

Checking out Joe Boruchow at Intersections

INTERSECTIONS brings two of Philadelphia’s well-known and loved “street artists”, Kid Hazo (pronounced has•ohh) and Joe Boruchow, to the same room.  Both artists almost solely install their works in the city of Philadelphia cementing themselves as artists who embody the vibe of our city.

Their work catches your attention and drives conversation… Though their approach to the creation and the life of their works couldn’t differ more, their poignant intersecting in this show brings the evolutionary chain of street art full circle: from the urban to the fine art.

Paperclips215 on her Social Media grind / photo by Kendall Whitehouse

Paperclips215 on her Social Media grind / photo by Kendall Whitehouse

Joe Burochow’s work is often punctuated with words you don’t necessarily associate with street art: poignant and elegant.

He gives his intricate paper cutouts a life outside their custom frames, reproducing them as wheat pastes, integrating his pattern play of stories into the city’s architecture.

Hazo’s belief that art is for everyone punctuates our daily interactions with his light-hearted – one step ahead of you – clever pieces that parody the heart of Philly culture. It reminds us not to take life too seriously (and maybe to stick to just one selfie per day if we can).

The point where one crosses the other plays out on the streets where the impact of their work lies with the beholder who might just want to hold on to that feeling a bit longer.

'Unemployed' Kid Hazo / photo by Kendall Whitehouse

‘Unemployed’ Kid Hazo / photo by Kendall Whitehouse

'Exit Stage Left' / Kid Hazo

‘Exit Stage Left’ / Kid Hazo

 

*review seen first at Paradigmarts.org