Insect Alchemy: Tyler Thrasher

 

Insect Alchemy: Tyler Thrasher_Crystallized Cicada

I stumbled onto a website full of fragile creatures dusted with crystals the color of jeweled dewdrops. These bespoke creatures are the creation of Tyler Thrasher, a Tulsa, Oklahoma native with a penchant for combining nature and science – with enchanting results.

“For as long as I can recall, my work has revolved around these things, because I revolve around these things. I am driven by these elements, and in turn they are driving me. Most of my time is spent exploring, reacting to, and prodding nature.”

Insect Alchemy: Tyler Thrasher_cicacda crystallized

Insect Alchemy: Tyler Thrasher

Though not a taxidermist himself, Tyler crafts’ unique pieces of arts from the specimens’, they are treated with various compounds to yield crystal growth – each reacting differently to the solution.

The curiosity and love of nature is clear in the gentle reworking of beauty, shifting these complex bodies into a collection of things that seem imagined from the pages of an otherworldly tale. They lay on the border of the enchantingly macabre if you consider a dead thing capable of birthing a new existence through bewitchment.

Insect Alchemy: Tyler Thrasher

Insect Alchemy: Tyler Thrasher _beetle

Insect Alchemy: Tyler Thrasher _skull

Insect Alchemy: Tyler Thrasher _ crystallized bat

Insect Alchemy: Tyler Thrasher_ Moth

Insect Alchemy: Tyler Thrasher

Insect Alchemy: Tyler Thrasher _ butterflies perserved

Tyler Thrasher [ Instagram | Facebook ]
Photo by Tyler Thrasher

Discover: Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures don’t seem intentional, more like ornamental sculptures used to wistfully decorate English gardens that nature had other plans for.  Aganetha’s work considers environmental issues, specifically the power of the small and its impact globally.  Over the past twenty-two years, she’s collaborated with bees to further her studies on interspecies communication, her research asks questions about the ramifications all living beings would experience should honeybees disappear from earth.

The porcelain figures are placed the bees in enclosures serving as a canvas, the bees are in effect her partners in the creations of the beautiful honeycomb sculptures. The figurines covered in the bee’s honeycombs are meant to show how intertwined our two species existences are, and start a conversation begin about our behaviors towards bees.  Leading to questioning the ramifications all living beings would experience should honeybees disappear from earth.

View “Guest Workers,” a short film on her sculptures after the pictures.

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Chess • Tableau, beeswax, honeycomb, found figurine, 2008. Photo credit: Peter Dyck.

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Veiled Lady • Figurine, beeswax, bees, circa 2007-08. Photo: Peter Dyck

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

 

Catch it: Aganetha Dyck [Website]

Photos courtesy of the Aganetha Dyck website

Discover: Tsurubride the art of Meghan Willis

Tsuru Bride-tart

Brooklyn based artist, Tsuru Bride (Japanese word for crane), aka Meghan Willis, celebrates women’s strength and sexuality through her work; and I love her semi-super hero dossier. “By day I work in the apparel industry, and by night I explore the art of undressing, movement, and sensuality through embroidery,” she writes. “I aim to tempt the viewer to follow the delicate stitching that caresses the bodies I reveal through thread.”

Her work is hand embroidered on linen, leather appliques are stitched often creating colorful illusions, then hand painted with acrylics. Check it out these conversation starters…

 

Tsuru Bride-tart

Tart, Stretched Canvas, 8″ x 10″

Tsuru Bride-open closed

Open Closed, 10″ x 11″

Tsuru Bride-tug

TUG, silk organza, Liberty print, and leather appliques 10″ x 12″

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Double Exposure No. 5 (Tita), 8″ x10″

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Double Exposure No. 3 (Nina), 8″ x 10″

Tsuru Bride-rift

Rift, 9″ x 17″

Tsuru Bride-coy

Coy, 10″ x 15″

 

Discover More:

Tsurubride Instagram

Tsurubride Website

photos courtesy of Meghan Willis website.

The Kids’ Eye: An Interview with Kid Hazo

The Kids’ Eye is where creative kids interview artists whose work they admire.

We prep — give them tips on proper interviewing etiquette, arm them with a camera, a recorder and then we let them loose.

We’re only there to observe.  The questions are theirs, the interviews haven’t been rewritten to sound like anything other than the probing journalism of a tween.

Tatianna is 14 years old – the kid behind the ‘Kids Eye’.  You might recall her inaugural interview for the series was with Philadelphia artist, Drew Leshko. This time up the hot seat belongs to Kid Hazo (pronounced has•ohh).

This go around is a tad different – Kid Hazo is a pretty mysterious figure.  The Philly based street artists’ work punctuates our daily interactions with his light-hearted – one step ahead of you – clever pieces that parody the heart of Philly culture. We contacted Kid and he arranged a Google Chat. There wasn’t going to be any identity unveiling, not even for a eager youngin’.  What you’re going to read is a cut & paste from their chat session.

Ready? Because here’s what happens when you let a tween off the leash… the creative leash that is.

Kid Hazo

photo courtesy of Kid Hazo

 

Day before the Interview

Kid Hazo: Let’s chat on Hangouts!

Tatianna: Video chat?

Kid Hazo: txt only!

Tatianna: Aww.

 

Day of Interview

T: Helloooo Kid Hazo, it is Tatianna.

KH: Why hello Tati. How are you?

T: I’m good how are you?

KH: Very good, thanks for asking!

T: Ok, are you ready for some questions?

KH: Ready when you are!

 

T: How long have you been an artist?

KH: I have been Kid Hazo since 2013, so 3 years?

 

T: Did you always know that you wanted to be a artist?

KH: I did not. I am just a big fan of street art. When I saw less being put up in Philly I decided I would step in and try to help out with new installations under this new identity.

 

Kid Hazo Insecurity Cameras

photo courtesy of Kid Hazo

 

T: Why did you pick street signs?

KH: Because I was a big fan of TrustoCorp’s work. I wanted to put my own twist on it.

T: Cool. How do you do all of your big pieces? Like the underwear

KH: Depends…sometimes I make things by hand, sometimes I buy things and alter them… Sometimes I use magic.

Kid Hazo takes out the Laundry

photo courtesy of Conrad Benner/Streets Dept

Kid Hazo White Undies

photo courtesy of Conrad Benner/Streets Dept

T: What type of magic do you use?

KH: Usually the same magic spells as Harry Potter does…that’s how I stay invisible!!

 

T: So you work alone?

KH: For the most part yes. Unless I do a collaboration with someone.

 

T: Why do you wear a mask?

KH: Because I would rather people focus on the artwork than deal with identity politics.

 

T: Where does a girl like me go to get a mask like yours?

KH: At the street art mask store…..?

 

T: Are you playing with me?

KH: Hahaha. Yes.

I have all of my secret spots. I can’t just reveal all the magic to you Tati!

T: why not :(

KH: Well I certainly can’t have Kid Hazo look alike characters running around the city ya know!!

 

T: Is being a artist your only job?

KH: No the artist job is just part time!

 

T: So what is your other job?

KH: My other job is working with computers…

 

T: So you’re smart.

KH: Hahaha, perhaps..

 

T: It is time for the fun questions!

KH: Yay!

 

T: What is your favorite TV show?

KH: Hmmm….right now Silicon Valley

T: I’ve never seen it before.

 

KH: What’s your favorite show?

T: I watch a lot of TV, so it is hard to pick just one.

KH: Haha gotcha.

 

T: What is the craziest thing you ever did?

KH: The craziest thing I ever did? HMMM….

One time I dressed up as a city street worker to install my “With Love XOXO” spoof ads and got away with it!

T: LOL. I remember those.

Kid Hazo XOXO Sign

 

T: If you had to pick a song that played every time you walked into a room what would it be?

KH: Boyz II Men – Motownphilly

 

T: Wow, now i’m listening to this and dancing right now. Thanks for that information.

KH: Hahaha no problem!

 

T: If you were a super hero who would you be?

KH: Hahaha awesome.  I like Spiderman, he seems like he has a lot of fun swinging around the city

T: Spiderman is ok.

KH: SPIDERMAN IS THE COOLEST.

T: I like Batman, he is so much cooler.

KH: Ugh….FINE.

But yea Batman is pretty cool

T: I’m always right.

Now it is time for the last question.

KH: I am actually like Bruce Wayne at art gallery shows anyway.

T: K, last question!

What would you do if some told you that you could never do art?

 

KH: I would do it anyway!!!

T: And if they stopped you?

…….?

…………..?

………………..?

KH: I would start all over under a new name!

Can’t stop, won’t stop!

 

T: This was very fun, sadly I have to go.  I hope to see you next year and good-bye.

KH: Sounds good! Thanks for interviewing me! Bye Tati!

T: You’re Welcome!

 

Biancoshock Hides Miniature Rooms inside Abandoned Manholes

Artist Biancoshock considers himself a classic activist and a performative artist. He refers to his art as “Ephemeralism” – the purpose of producing works of art that have to exist briefly in space but limitlessly in time through the photography, the video and the media.

His 2016 art installation “Borderlife” was his call to a bigger awareness.  He transformed 3 vacant subterranean maintenance vaults into miniature underground rooms in the Lodi district of Milan.  The spaces included a tiny kitchen, with hanging utensils and a wall clock; a bathroom, with an attached showerhead and towel rack; and a small, wallpapered hallway featuring a painting and hat.

It’s pointing a finger toward a social injustice – a hidden reality that most remain unaware of.  The living conditions of those forced to occupy confined spaces – with a focus on those who live underground, behind manholes.

This is where street art becomes more than a IG photo opportunity lying in wait. It becomes a chance to educate, to tell the story of the those who have no voice and no platform on which to be heard.

 

“If some problems can not be avoided, make them comfortable.
Intervention that, parodically, speaks about people forced to live in extreme conditions, even coming to live in manholes.
An example of inspiration is  Bucharest, where more than 600 people live underground, in the sewers.” – Biancoshock

 

Read more on the inspiration behind the art:  Kids of the ‘ Republic of the Sewers’.

Ben Cuevas ‘Transcending the Material’

Los Angeles-based artist Ben Cuevas’ current obsession is yarn.  Knitting worked itself into his art after he learned from a close friend and now creating conversations via fiber sculptures is a central feature of his work.

Our favorite so far is his installation entitled “Transcending the Material” where a knit sculpture of a human skeleton sits in lotus position atop a pyramid of Borden’s condensed milk cans.

“…It’s such a tactile medium and I’m really drawn to that quality of the material. The way it feels in your hands, the way it helps you mark the passing of time…all of these qualities seem very meditative to me.  I enjoy the rich cultural and social history that surrounds fiber arts, as well as blending the distinctions between art and craft. The time intensive and repetitive nature of knitting allows me to meditate on a piece as it comes into being, further revealing the nature of the work as part of the process.

While I explore a wide range of subject matter (such as gender and sexual identity, human rights, and ecological impact), my work is rooted by my desire to explore the condition of embodiment through comparative philosophical perspectives, reflecting on what it means to have a body, to inhabit a body, to be a body incarnated in, and interacting with, this world.”

Zoe Buckman: Mostly It’s Just Uncomfortable

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Mostly It’s Just Uncomfortable is part of Buckman’s response to the attack on Planned Parenthood in the United States, the consequent deprivation of access to free sexual health care for underserved women, as well as the attempted curtailing of a woman’s right to make choices concerning her own body.

Examining the cold and harsh material quality of gynecological instruments, Buckman finds a way of reversing her negative perception of these objects turning them into playful more tactile sculptural entities through the process of Powder Coating. This in-progress series of sculptures examines the physical discomfort women have to endure via these necessary and sometimes life-saving instruments. Also working with boxing iconography, Buckman has cast her own boxing gloves, hand wraps, and mouth guard in glass and metal, further marrying the stereotypically masculine to the feminine, and the fragile to the resilient. This dialogue between polarized materials is typical of Buckman’s work, yet the combat pieces speak to a new and more confrontational discourse in the artist’s process.*

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What’s Going On: Buckman is fresh off the latest group exhibitions “Off the Wall – For Freedoms”, at the Monique Meloche Gallery in Chicago, IL.

Next Up: Harlem Postcards Fall/Winter 2016-2017, The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY
•SoundScape Park Evening Film Program 2016, Art Basel Miami Beach, Miami, FL
•PULSE will also present the following works as part of the PROJECTS program: Zoe Buckman’s Champ, 2016, a neon work created in response to the attack on Planned Parenthood in the United States, the consequent deprivation of access to free sexual health care for underserved women, and the attempted curtailing of a woman’s right to make choices concerning her own body.

*statement from artist website

 

Shifting Consciousness with Chiharu Shiota

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"The Locked Room" 2016, KAAT Kanagawa Arts Theater, Yokohama, Japan, photo by Masanobu Nishino “The Locked Room” 2016, KAAT Kanagawa Arts Theater, Yokohama, Japan, photo by Masanobu Nishino

‘A sleepy mystery intertwined with beauty’, is how I like to think of Chiharu Shiota’s intricate large-scale installation pieces exploring the relationship between body and mind. Her work feels like being let into remnants of someone else’s dreams.

She tethers her memories to objects with lengths of tangled, crisscrossing black threads, securing them in a physical realm. Here we are offered the questions, the quandaries of an woman who dreams herself in and out of reality without ever really leaving the suspension of time.

It’s rare to see Shiota’s installations come towards the U.S., although (claps) her 2017 exhibition calendar has a solo show booked for Feb 21 2017 – Aug 6 at the SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah, GA / U.S.A.

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Conscious Sleep, Venue: Cockatoo Island, 22th Biennale of Sydney, photo by Paul Green

Conscious Sleep, Venue: Cockatoo Island, 22th Biennale of Sydney, photo by Paul Green

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“When I dream, I feel the dream as reality. I can’t distinguish between dream and reality. When I wake up, I have the feeling I’m still dreaming.” -Chiharu Shiota

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I found a pretty amazing time lapse of “After the Dream” being installed at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery during the ‘Lost in Lace’ exhibition in London back in 2011.

DISCOVER: THE COMING UNDONE OF ANA TERESA BARBOZA

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Textile Artist, Ana Teresa Barboza is onto new things – embroidered landscapes and plants. But I’ll be forever attached to her series, BORDADOS, where she explores the art of embroidering the body and skin.

It’s visually intoxicating to imagine the grabbing, the pulling of oneself apart into threads to rearrange your fabric; stitch yourself back together in a way more suitable to breathe.

She makes it seem a natural course of thought, that one could exist in a space that allows nature to emulate canvas, where we can weave ourselves anew with needle and thread. These works are primal representations of structures torn from within or adorned throughout.

 

“Working with my hands, it’s something I’ve always done since childhood… and the incredible images that textiles can produce. I feel the fabric gives familiarity to the image, it pulls you in to stop and admire the details.”* – Ana Teresa Barboza

 

Artist Links: Ana Teresa Barboza Website

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bordados

 

*quote taken from interview with Barboza at Textile Artist.

Explore another artist who takes needle to skin, in our interview with  Eliza Bennet’s “A Women’s Work is Never Done”.

 

Floral Cross-Stitch Street Installations Hit Spain

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cross-stitch-3 cross-stitch-art-by-raquel-rodrigo-15-1020x610Floral Cross-Stitch Street Installations spreading across Spain in cities like Madrid and Valencia, have been freed from the confines of the hoop by set designer & artist Raquel Rodrigo  who owns a specialized street-art marketing agency (Arquiscostura) working for large brands to impact people in the most important cities in the real world as well as press & publications in most important online portals.

Her multi-colored cords dash in and out of wire mesh leaving pixel heavy imagery of flowers that can be easily affixed to forgotten surfaces calling attention buildings or businesses that need a little extra love.

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Via This is Colossal

Images via Arquicostura

Temptation of Void: Bizarre Family Phototraits by Alexei Sovertkov

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These bizarre family portraits feel like a young Jules Verne worked his way through school at a Sears portrait studio – exploring the unknown within us before he ventured out into the world – and I kind of dig it.

Moscow-based photographer, Alexei Sovertkov, calls the series “Temptation of Void”, it explores voidness as a quality of consciousness. I love the  coupling of people & animals as it visually gives context to the ties of the human in relation to the non-human, each one seemingly isolated from the other underneath fishbowls makes me think of the aspects of our individual experiences.

Sovertkov clearly keeps his sense of humor in the quandary,  you can see IKEA stickers still affixed on the bottom of these fishbowls revealing the subjects bemused expressions at the whole experiment – whatever that might actually be.

“Voidness as a mental state, means a mode of perception in which one neither adds anything to nor takes anything away from what is present, noting simply, “There is this.” This mode is achieved through a process of intense concentration, coupled with the insight that notes more and more subtle levels of the presence and absence of disturbance.” – Alexei Sovertkov

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Discover: Yoan Capote

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Self-portrait (each one of us) 2002 to 2008 | Concrete and cast bronze |175 x 50 x 50 cm | Yoan Capote

 

Cuban artist, Yoan Capote peeks our interest with sculpture work that creates harmony between materials that stand in stark contrast in the face of their duality.  It might be what draws you to his work; but Capote mentioned in an interview that the materials don’t determine his work. “Ideas are critical to my deciding which materials to use…Whenever you have something interesting to convey, you look for the ideal way to express it.”*

His visual metaphors are striking; the chords of his work strike emotional tones of compassion, a connect with our humanity, and a sight into our fragility.  One of our favorites pieces is Self-Portrait.  In Self-Portrait, Capote used molds of real bones with provenance from different dead people; then, he reproduced each one of them in wax, adjusting them and creating the representation of a new subject in that sculpture. The weight of the concrete is used like a symbolic element. Equilibrium is a metaphor of struggle and resistance. Gravity reminds the spiritual weight that everyone supports and talks about fragility of our own life.

Discover more on Yoan Capote: Website

 

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New Man 2014 Real handcuffs, cast bronze and stainless steel structure | 221.5 x 61 x 46 cm | Yoan Capote

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*quote comes from Capote interview with Phyllis Tuchman
– description of Self Portrait and photos from the artist