Discover: Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures don’t seem intentional, more like ornamental sculptures used to wistfully decorate English gardens that nature had other plans for.  Aganetha’s work considers environmental issues, specifically the power of the small and its impact globally.  Over the past twenty-two years, she’s collaborated with bees to further her studies on interspecies communication, her research asks questions about the ramifications all living beings would experience should honeybees disappear from earth.

The porcelain figures are placed the bees in enclosures serving as a canvas, the bees are in effect her partners in the creations of the beautiful honeycomb sculptures. The figurines covered in the bee’s honeycombs are meant to show how intertwined our two species existences are, and start a conversation begin about our behaviors towards bees.  Leading to questioning the ramifications all living beings would experience should honeybees disappear from earth.

View “Guest Workers,” a short film on her sculptures after the pictures.

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Chess • Tableau, beeswax, honeycomb, found figurine, 2008. Photo credit: Peter Dyck.

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

Veiled Lady • Figurine, beeswax, bees, circa 2007-08. Photo: Peter Dyck

Aganetha Dyck Bee Comb Sculptures

 

Catch it: Aganetha Dyck [Website]

Photos courtesy of the Aganetha Dyck website

F is for Frieke Janssens

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Do you remember this photo series by Frieke Janssens?

Photographer Frieke Janssens controversial series, Smoking Kids, saw children ages 4-9 dressed in outfits that evoked particular periods of cigarette culture.  While the costuming and posing of the children evokes perhaps a certain glamour that some still find in the begone ‘Mad Menesque’ era, visually you are forced to see the ugliness of smoking when juxtaposed with the youth of her subjects. These photo narratives question whether or not the fascination for cigarettes is as enticing when viewed on children. Now, the cigarettes used in the photos were actually fashioned out of cheese, candles and incense – though I doubt that will make most comfortable with the subject matter.

A lot of Janssens’ work tackles addiction and social change. The uneasiness the viewer experiences while looking at her photography parallels that of our society’s approach to tackling these long standing obstacles. We’ve allowed ourselves to view many of these as acceptable modern societal norms – and she challenges that.

Her latest series Animalcoholics goes surrealist as it imagines alcoholics down to their base selves, after loss of self control and self consciousness has reduced them to their primal selves.

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Frieke Janssens_Smoking Kids Frieke Janssens_Smoking Kids

Link up: Frieke Janssens Website / Instagram @friekejanssens_photography

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Genre: Photography

Discover: Tsurubride the art of Meghan Willis

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Brooklyn based artist, Tsuru Bride (Japanese word for crane), aka Meghan Willis, celebrates women’s strength and sexuality through her work; and I love her semi-super hero dossier. “By day I work in the apparel industry, and by night I explore the art of undressing, movement, and sensuality through embroidery,” she writes. “I aim to tempt the viewer to follow the delicate stitching that caresses the bodies I reveal through thread.”

Her work is hand embroidered on linen, leather appliques are stitched often creating colorful illusions, then hand painted with acrylics. Check it out these conversation starters…

 

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Tart, Stretched Canvas, 8″ x 10″

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Open Closed, 10″ x 11″

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TUG, silk organza, Liberty print, and leather appliques 10″ x 12″

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Double Exposure No. 5 (Tita), 8″ x10″

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Double Exposure No. 3 (Nina), 8″ x 10″

Tsuru Bride-rift

Rift, 9″ x 17″

Tsuru Bride-coy

Coy, 10″ x 15″

 

Discover More:

Tsurubride Instagram

Tsurubride Website

photos courtesy of Meghan Willis website.

Shifting Consciousness with Chiharu Shiota

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"The Locked Room" 2016, KAAT Kanagawa Arts Theater, Yokohama, Japan, photo by Masanobu Nishino “The Locked Room” 2016, KAAT Kanagawa Arts Theater, Yokohama, Japan, photo by Masanobu Nishino

‘A sleepy mystery intertwined with beauty’, is how I like to think of Chiharu Shiota’s intricate large-scale installation pieces exploring the relationship between body and mind. Her work feels like being let into remnants of someone else’s dreams.

She tethers her memories to objects with lengths of tangled, crisscrossing black threads, securing them in a physical realm. Here we are offered the questions, the quandaries of an woman who dreams herself in and out of reality without ever really leaving the suspension of time.

It’s rare to see Shiota’s installations come towards the U.S., although (claps) her 2017 exhibition calendar has a solo show booked for Feb 21 2017 – Aug 6 at the SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah, GA / U.S.A.

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Conscious Sleep, Venue: Cockatoo Island, 22th Biennale of Sydney, photo by Paul Green

Conscious Sleep, Venue: Cockatoo Island, 22th Biennale of Sydney, photo by Paul Green

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“When I dream, I feel the dream as reality. I can’t distinguish between dream and reality. When I wake up, I have the feeling I’m still dreaming.” -Chiharu Shiota

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I found a pretty amazing time lapse of “After the Dream” being installed at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery during the ‘Lost in Lace’ exhibition in London back in 2011.

DISCOVER: THE COMING UNDONE OF ANA TERESA BARBOZA

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Textile Artist, Ana Teresa Barboza is onto new things – embroidered landscapes and plants. But I’ll be forever attached to her series, BORDADOS, where she explores the art of embroidering the body and skin.

It’s visually intoxicating to imagine the grabbing, the pulling of oneself apart into threads to rearrange your fabric; stitch yourself back together in a way more suitable to breathe.

She makes it seem a natural course of thought, that one could exist in a space that allows nature to emulate canvas, where we can weave ourselves anew with needle and thread. These works are primal representations of structures torn from within or adorned throughout.

 

“Working with my hands, it’s something I’ve always done since childhood… and the incredible images that textiles can produce. I feel the fabric gives familiarity to the image, it pulls you in to stop and admire the details.”* – Ana Teresa Barboza

 

Artist Links: Ana Teresa Barboza Website

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*quote taken from interview with Barboza at Textile Artist.

Explore another artist who takes needle to skin, in our interview with  Eliza Bennet’s “A Women’s Work is Never Done”.

 

Discover: Yoan Capote

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Self-portrait (each one of us) 2002 to 2008 | Concrete and cast bronze |175 x 50 x 50 cm | Yoan Capote

 

Cuban artist, Yoan Capote peeks our interest with sculpture work that creates harmony between materials that stand in stark contrast in the face of their duality.  It might be what draws you to his work; but Capote mentioned in an interview that the materials don’t determine his work. “Ideas are critical to my deciding which materials to use…Whenever you have something interesting to convey, you look for the ideal way to express it.”*

His visual metaphors are striking; the chords of his work strike emotional tones of compassion, a connect with our humanity, and a sight into our fragility.  One of our favorites pieces is Self-Portrait.  In Self-Portrait, Capote used molds of real bones with provenance from different dead people; then, he reproduced each one of them in wax, adjusting them and creating the representation of a new subject in that sculpture. The weight of the concrete is used like a symbolic element. Equilibrium is a metaphor of struggle and resistance. Gravity reminds the spiritual weight that everyone supports and talks about fragility of our own life.

Discover more on Yoan Capote: Website

 

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New Man 2014 Real handcuffs, cast bronze and stainless steel structure | 221.5 x 61 x 46 cm | Yoan Capote

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*quote comes from Capote interview with Phyllis Tuchman
– description of Self Portrait and photos from the artist

Discover: Rune Guneriussen

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Norwegian conceptual artist Rune Guneriussen creates whimsical worlds that highlight the natural beauty of his chosen locales. Integrating everyday, man-made objects into his work, Guneriussen assembles temporary, site-specific sculptures that he photographs using a analog plate camera.

It can take days before he finds the perfect secluded location. Items are hauled there by foot and arranged to sit within the perfect balance of light, illuminated by what Guneriussen refers to as the ‘blue hour’. Once the image is taken, he quickly dismantles the work, leaving no trace of it behind.

“As an artist he believes strongly that art itself should be questioning and bewildering as opposed to patronizing and restricting…he does not want to dictate a way to the understanding of his art, but rather indicate a path to understanding a story,” Guneriussen states in the third person on his website.

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Discover more of Guneriussen’s work:
Website \ Facebook

C is for Conor Harrington

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UK based street artist, Conor Harrington envisions the historical with street art styling, producing hypermodern murals that toss you right into the fray. His over-sized dramatic figures, regally attired in tattered historical garb loom over the viewer, poised in the throes of epic fights fought out on the side of buildings and city walls. Each scene drips with a sense of visceral urgency, bringing life to these amazing oil painting mimics.

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Like most recorded history, it’s all mapped out and planned before its written down. Scenes are staged like large-scale compositions and photographed in the studio before they’re executed outside.  Oil paintings from the days of our forefathers never looked like this. But if there was some Colonial Fight Club action taking place, chances are, it went down like this.

Watch it evolve:

Link up: Conor Harrington Website / Instagram @conorsaysboom

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Genre: Street Art

B is for Boy Kong

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B is for Boy Kong.  We caught Boy Kong’s work a few years ago during Armory Week, at the Fountain Art Fair and developed an instant connect.  Since then, we’ve been enjoying his stylized show pieces – they are vibrant, collaged images in motion that emote enough energy to taunt a viewer into standing there long enough to catch the moment they break free of the framing.

Boy Kong jumps around from painting, to illustrating, to muralist, but his gallery pieces are our favorites.  You’re just as likely to see a piece at a show or on the street – a double treat. 

Until then, you can check out his work by following these links:  Instagram: @BOYKONG Facebook: BOY KONG

Genre: Contemporary Art

A is for ANDREA HEIMER

 

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Poplar Street Was Like A Dozen Others To The East Or West Of It And Friday Nights Looked Like This,  10 PM Parents Bedroom Light Goes Out Girls Room Lights Stay On 11 PM Boys At The Window Hand Over Fists 

 

A is for Andrea Heimer, whose incredibly detailed paintings are humorously dark, undressing the normal white-picket fence facade of her suburban upbringing in a perverse and yet strangely appealing way.

Don’t Miss: Her paintings’ long titles that read like opening lines of a David Sedaris essay.

Check out our first chat with Heimer here on hahamag.com and then go on to discover more:

Website – Andrea Heimer Instagram

Genre: Outsider Art

The MET: Home To The Greatest Collection of Primitive Art and a True American Mystery

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The Michael C. Rockefeller Wing in the Metropolitan Museum of Art hosts an assemblage of what is thought to be the greatest collection of primitive art.  It is also haunted with a narrative of sensationalized news headlines – a puzzled mystery of an heir’s disappearance, Dutch colonialism, revenge killing and cannibalism.

Over 50 years ago, Michael C. Rockefeller, son of then Governor of New York City, Nelson Rockefeller (yes, those Rockefeller’s) went missing in New Guinea, then known as Dutch New Guinea.

At 23, an age when most are still trying to figure out their lives, Michael was half-way across the world in a remote part of New Guinea documenting barely contacted tribes. He was also collecting Asmat art for his father’s Museum of Primitive Art at 15 W. 54th St.

Michael had already made several successful trips through the coastal region of New Guinea to Asmat, bartering goods like steel and tobacco in exchange for their intricate sacred wood carvings. In November 1961, during a return expedition to the Asmat region, Michael, and Dutch anthropologist Rene Wassing were stranded when their catamaran capsized on the Betsj River.  After a night adrift, Michael decided to try to swim to shore to find help, leaving Wassing clinging to the overturned hull.  Michael’s last words to him were, ‘I think I can make it…’ Wassing was rescued the next morning – Michael was never seen again.

After a monthlong search without success, the cause of death was ruled as drowning. But speculations and rumors ensued that Michael had been eaten by crocodiles, made it to shore and got lost in the jungle, worse yet, killed and eaten by local Asmat headhunters.

The Asmat culture is hinged on a “complex spiritual world balanced by ceremonies, ritual, and reciprocal violence,” writes Carl Hoffman, author of Savage Harvest, a new book that delivers a convincing case for the story behind Michael’s disappearance.

“Headhunting and cannibalism were as right to them as taking communion or kneeling on the carpet facing Mecca,” he writes

Michael Rockefeller had arrived in New Guinea during a time of change.  The Dutch government had taken over the United East India Company occupation in the region, overseeing the colonies.  On their watch, five Asmat leaders were gunned down.  Tragic events made even more unfortunate when you ponder on the Asmat believe that death requires death, and retribution is vital to placating the spirits.  Now image that Michael might have walked into that world at the wrong time.

During his time in New Guinea, Michael gathered hundreds of items, among them sacred hand carved bisj poles – ancestor poles with interwoven carvings to honor the spirit of a slain warrior or tribesman and represent the responsibility to avenge that death. They now stand in the Michael C. Rockefeller Wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, which absorbed the collections of the Museum of Primitive Art after it closed in 1976.

When you visit this wing, keep in mind, Nelson Rockefeller was the major force behind this ambitious attempt to amass enough pieces to mount the largest exhibition of primitive art ‘ever’. Rockefeller held a pioneering belief that artists from Africa, Oceania, and the Americas were equal in every respect to those of their peers across the globe – earlier generations of Metropolitan directors did not share his enthusiasm for non-Western art.

Each piece is a testament to the skepticism he ignored and a reminder of a life that was lost acquiring some of it.

Explore the art that help change the map of the MET and learn more about the dynamics of Asmat society.  The Primitive Art collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art – you haven’t experienced it until you’ve seen it.

Read More: What Really Happened to Michael Rockefeller Smithsonian Magazine excerpt from Savage Harvest: A Tale of Cannibals, Colonialism and Michael Rockefeller’s Tragic Quest for Primitive Art, by Carl Hoffman. by Carl Hoffman

The Vanishing ‘Savage Harvest’ by Carl Hoffman – NY Times Book Review

The Nelson A. Rockefeller Vision: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas” The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, v. 72, no. 1

Watch More: The Search for Michael Rockefeller (documentary) Netflix on Demand

Learn More: Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas / Michael Rockefeller Wing at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

Michael Rockefeller Wing

Asmat Bisj Poles

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Headdress Effigy (Hareiga) / Chachet Baining people, Papua New Guinea

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